24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Health Tip: Help Young Athletes Avoid MalnutritionShould More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?Risk of Post-Op Infections Up in Overweight, Obese ChildrenParents Have Mixed Views on When to Keep Sick Kids Out of SchoolKids Born to Opioid-Addicted Moms Seem to Fare Poorly in SchoolPediatricians Offer Heads-Up for Preventing Soccer InjuriesHead for the Hills With Sled Safety in MindKids' Use of Artificial Sweeteners Spiked in Recent YearsHow to Spot a Common, Potentially Dangerous, Childhood IllnessDespite Pledges, No Improvement in Chain Restaurant Kids' Menus: StudyKids' Care May Suffer When Parents Clash With Medical StaffPoverty's Impact on a Child's Mental HealthAre Heartburn Meds During Pregnancy Linked to Asthma in Kids?Special Diet May Be Boon for Kids With Crohn's, ColitisKids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking LawsExercise: An Antidote for Behavioral Issues in Students?Kids With Concussion Need Vision Check Before Return to SchoolHow to Keep Your Kids Cozy and Safe by the FiresideFor Kids With Kidney Disease, Race May Play Role in OutcomesDisabled Children Face Bullying Throughout School YearsHealth Tip: Watch Salt in Kids' DietsKids Landing in ERs After Drinking Parents' E-Cig Nicotine LiquidKids' Restaurant Meals Need Slimming Down: NutritionistsHealth Care Spending for U.S. Kids Jumped 56 Percent in Less Than 20 YearsHealth Tip: When a Child Is SickHealth Tip: Getting Your Child VaccinatedMumps Cases Hit 10-Year High in U.S.Give Kids a Safe, Stress-Free HolidayRest May Not Be Best for Kids After ConcussionSome Kids' Genes Might Make Food Ads More TemptingThe Impact of Child Abuse Can Last a LifetimeHealth Tip: If Your Child is CyberbulliedChild Abuse Cases in Army Families May Be Under-ReportedEmergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer CountriesHealth Tip: Help Kids Develop Healthy AmbitionMice May Be Key to Kids' Asthma Attacks at SchoolPCPs Order More Food Allergen Panels Than AllergistsNIAAA Two-Question Alcohol Screen Valid in Pediatric ERsHealth Tip: Build Your Child's Healthy PlateRSNA: Children Can Sustain Major Chest Injuries From ATV CrashesPediatricians Can Help When Parents Divorce: ReportMartial Arts Can Be Hazardous to KidsU.S. Kids Are Eating Healthier Now, But . . .Keep Kids in Mind When Politics Intrude at Thanksgiving'Enthusiastic' Dads May Mean Less Troubled Kids: StudyMore U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant InfectionsPhysical Punishment of Children Declining in the United StatesStressed Childhood Might Raise Risk for High Blood Pressure LaterHealth Tip: Encourage Kids to Choose Good FriendsDoctors Use iPads to Treat 'Lazy Eye,' With Mixed Results
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

NIAAA Two-Question Alcohol Screen Valid in Pediatric ERs


HealthDay News
Updated: Nov 30th 2016

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) two-question alcohol screen is valid for use within pediatric emergency departments (PEDs), according to a study published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

Anthony Spirito, Ph.D., from the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues examined the psychometric properties of the NIAAA two-question alcohol screen within U.S. PEDs. Participants included 4,838 12- to 17-year-olds treated in one of 16 participating PEDs. The NIAAA two-question screen was readministered one week later to 186 participants to assess test-retest reliability.

The researchers found that there was moderate to good test-retest reliability. The best combined sensitivity and specificity for determining a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder (AUD) was a classification of moderate risk or higher on the screen. Among middle school students, any past-year drinking increased the odds of a diagnosis of an AUD; the optimal cut-off for high school ages was three or more drinking days in the past year. For determining a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score, the optimal cutoff was one or more drinking days for middle school subjects and two or more drinking days for high school students.

"The NIAAA two-question screen is a brief, valid approach for alcohol screening in PEDs," the authors write. "A positive screen suggests that referral for further evaluation is indicated to determine if an adolescent has an AUD."

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)