24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Many Kids With Diabetes Missing Out on Eye Exams, Study FindsOlder Mothers May Raise Better-Behaved Kids, Study SuggestsHealth Tip: Check Your Child's TemperatureFruit Juice for Kids: A Serving a Day OK'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for Kids'Heads Up' Football Program Tackles Concussion Danger in KidsParents Don't Always Head to Child's Doctor When Illness StrikesSpring-Clean Your Medicine Cabinet to Safeguard Your KidsFewer U.S. Kids Overdosing on OpioidsWhy Some Kids Take Longer to Recover From Brain InjuryNearby Day Cares Don't Pose Health Risks to Kids: StudyObese Moms May Fail to Spot Obesity in Their Own KidsToo Much Screen Time May Raise Kids' Diabetes RiskHealth Tip: Help Kids Maintain Healthy CholesterolMite-Proof Bedding May Help Curb Asthma Attacks: StudyWatchful Waiting Cost-Effective for Pediatric Acute Otitis MediaHealth Tip: Make Sure Kids' Shoes Fit WellCity Tax on Cars Cut Pollution, Kids' Asthma RiskKidney Transplant Survival Up Among Babies, KidsSecondhand Smoke Linked to Food Allergies in KidsObesity May Raise Girls' Risk of Asthma, AllergiesDisabled Kids at Higher Risk of Abuse, Study FindsNasal 'Nerve Block' May Help Ease Kids' MigrainesCan Mom's Vitamin E Head Off Child's Asthma Risk?Asthma Much More Lethal for Black Children, Study FindsInsecticides Linked to Behavioral Issues in ChildrenCould Common Insecticides Be Tied to Behavior Issues in Kids?Complication Rates Often Higher in Youth With T2DM Versus T1DMChildhood Cancer Survivors Living LongerYouth With Type 2 Diabetes Often Face ComplicationsKids Mean Less Shuteye for Mom, While Dad Slumbers On'Superbug' Infections Striking More U.S. KidsHeadaches Often Strike Before Strokes in Kids: StudyACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially GirlsLearning Issues Common in Kids With Heart Defects: StudyAAP Policy Statement Focuses on Child Witness Well-BeingKids Born to Older Moms Score Higher on Thinking TestsThere's Fun and Fitness in the Pool for Asthmatic KidsMost Parents Don't Think They're Meeting Kids' Nutritional NeedsKids' OD Risk Rises When Opioids Left Out at HomeAntibiotics Could Be Alternative to Surgery for AppendicitisIs Surgery Always Needed for Kids' Appendicitis?Health Tip: Give Your Kids Bone-Building FoodLow-Income Kids More Likely to Have ADHD, AsthmaTougher Alcohol Laws Mean Fewer Young People Killed on the RoadHealth Tip: Protect Kids in Cold WeatherNeeded: An 'Action Plan' for Kids Prone to Severe Allergic ReactionsBe Your Child's ValentineAmbient Air Pollution May Raise T2DM Risk in Hispanic ChildrenWinning the Veggie Wars With Kids
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

NIAAA Two-Question Alcohol Screen Valid in Pediatric ERs


HealthDay News
Updated: Nov 30th 2016

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) two-question alcohol screen is valid for use within pediatric emergency departments (PEDs), according to a study published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

Anthony Spirito, Ph.D., from the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues examined the psychometric properties of the NIAAA two-question alcohol screen within U.S. PEDs. Participants included 4,838 12- to 17-year-olds treated in one of 16 participating PEDs. The NIAAA two-question screen was readministered one week later to 186 participants to assess test-retest reliability.

The researchers found that there was moderate to good test-retest reliability. The best combined sensitivity and specificity for determining a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder (AUD) was a classification of moderate risk or higher on the screen. Among middle school students, any past-year drinking increased the odds of a diagnosis of an AUD; the optimal cut-off for high school ages was three or more drinking days in the past year. For determining a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score, the optimal cutoff was one or more drinking days for middle school subjects and two or more drinking days for high school students.

"The NIAAA two-question screen is a brief, valid approach for alcohol screening in PEDs," the authors write. "A positive screen suggests that referral for further evaluation is indicated to determine if an adolescent has an AUD."

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)