24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction to Disorders of ChildhoodIntellectual DisabilitiesMotor Skills DisordersLearning DisordersCommunication DisordersAutism and Pervasive Developmental DisordersADHD and Disruptive Behavior DisordersFeeding and Elimination DisordersAnxiety DisordersReactive Attachment DisorderStereotypic Movement DisorderTic DisordersInfancy, Childhood or Adolescence, Not Otherwise Specified
Latest News
Delayed Development ID'd in Five Brain Regions of ADHD PatientsExperimental Test Can Spot Autism in InfancyBrain Differences Hint at Why Autism Is More Common in MalesFor Kids, Regular Exercise Seems to Put Depression on the RunMicrobiota Transfer Therapy Could Help Children With AutismKids With ADHD Make 6.1 Million Doctor Visits a Year in U.S.: CDCPhysical Activity Predicts Depression in Middle ChildhoodU.S. Families Spend 1.5 Billion Hours Yearly on Kids With Special Health NeedsDown Syndrome May Not Be Big Financial Burden on FamiliesClinical Antecedents of Adolescent-Onset MDD IdentifiedFew Preschoolers Receiving Tx for Mood, Behavioral DisordersParents Often Miss Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in KidsHomeless, Mentally Ill Youth Benefit From Housing ProgramKids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: StudyModified Checklist With Follow-Up Valid for Autism in ToddlersMental Illness May Make Teens Vulnerable to Drugs, AlcoholTiming of Autism Diagnosis Tied to Choice of TreatmentHearing Impairment May Be an Early Indicator of AutismEpilepsy, Febrile Seizures in Childhood May Raise ADHD RiskInsurance Mandates Boost U.S. Autism DiagnosesDepression Strikes Nearly 3 Million U.S. Teens a YearSound Sleep Elusive for Many Kids With ADHDGenetic Insights May Help Kids Battling Developmental DelaysADHD Can First Appear in Young Adulthood for Some, Study SuggestsBaby's Immune System Might Hint at Autism RiskFor ADHD, Start With Behavior Therapy, Not Drugs: CDCAutism Diagnosed at Younger Ages'Wandering' a Hazard for More Than a Third of Kids With AutismTalk Therapy May Help Depressed Teens Who Shun AntidepressantsDepression More Common in Kids Who Join Gangs, Study FindsTracking Kids' Eye Movements Might Shed New Light on AutismChild Mental Health Care Varies Widely in Primary Care SettingsU.S. Autism Rate Unchanged at 1 in 68 Kids: CDCHealth Tip: Watch for Mental Health 'Red Flags' in KidsHow to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health ProblemTroubled Kids' Psychiatric Care Often Delayed by Insurance RulesMost Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey FindsPsychological Disorders Affect 1 in 7 U.S. Kids Under 9: CDCADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in KidsFidgeting May Help Students With ADHD LearnCould Adults' Expectations Drive Up ADHD Diagnoses in Kids?Guideline Changes Have Asperger's Community on EdgeHarmless Brain Abnormalities in Kids Pose Disclosure Dilemmas
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Autism
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Down Syndrome May Not Be Big Financial Burden on Families

HealthDay News
by -- Randy Dotinga
Updated: Dec 16th 2016

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although families with a child with Down syndrome do face extra medical expenses, they probably won't be deeply burdened financially, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that average monthly out-of-pocket medical costs are about $80 more for children with Down syndrome compared to other kids. That adds up to about $18,000 over the first 18 years of life, the study authors said.

"I think many people will be surprised to learn that parents have few extra medical expenses when raising a child or adolescent with Down syndrome, since health insurance covers most of the costs," said study author Dr. Brian Skotko. He is co-director of the Down Syndrome Program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

"After expectant couples receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome, many of them search online for information and find the lengthy list of medical conditions that might accompany their child," Skotko explained in a hospital news release.

"This can leave them to wonder whether their families will be facing financial hardship; so we wanted to provide them with accurate data reflecting the current situation," he noted.

The study authors examined a database of insurance claims from 1999 to 2013. The claims came from 82 self-insured Fortune 500 companies in the United States.

The researchers found nearly 5,200 children under the age of 18 with Down syndrome in the database. The investigators compared those kids to a similar group of almost 21,000 children without the condition.

The average annual out-of-pocket medical cost difference was $1,907 for kids with Down syndrome during the first year. The cost difference dipped to $537 annually when children were aged 13 to 18, the study revealed.

Skotko said he hopes the study findings provide some helpful information for families who receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome.

"Parents today have an array of financial planning and investment options, including special needs trusts, so I hope our findings can help families better prepare for their own financial futures," he said.

The study was published Dec. 14 in the American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A.

More information

For more about Down syndrome, visit the National Down Syndrome Society.