24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Helping Ease Kids' Fears After Manchester Terror AttackOverweight in Childhood May Up Lifetime Risk of DepressionOverweight Boys Face Higher Colon Cancer Risk as AdultsHeavy Kids Face Triple the Odds for Depression in AdulthoodHealth Tip: Limit a Young Child's Media TimeMany Parents Underestimate Drowning RisksChildren Express Positive Views of Digital Tracking by StrangersToo Many Parents Say No to Helmets for Kids on WheelsHear This! Keep Cotton Swabs Out of Kids' EarsHealth Tip: Be a Safe Driver for Your Kids'Dr. Google' May Undermine Parents' Trust in Their PediatricianPAS: Hospitalizations Up for Suicidal Thoughts, Actions in KidsGuns Send About 16 U.S. Kids to the Hospital Every DayWhen Grandparents Raise Grandkids, Are They Up to Date on Child Safety?More Starring Roles for Booze in Kids' Movies, Study FindsThe Family That Eats Together, BenefitsAre Smartphones Helping or Harming Kids' Mental Health?More Active Kids Could Save U.S. Billions in Health Costs: StudyTrump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era School Lunch RulesAre Bullies Getting Run Out of U.S. Schools?Health Tip: Turn Off Those ScreensKids' Sun Safety Means 'Slip, Slap, Slop'Pediatricians Missing Elevated Blood Lead Levels in U.S.AAP Stresses Medical Home Best for Acute Health ConcernsAre Kids' Vaccines a Victim of Their Own Success?Checklist for Family-Centered Rounds Deemed BeneficialChildren With Suspected Child Abuse Present to Hospital LateCancer Risk Rises After Childhood Organ Transplant: StudyModel Predicts Which Pediatric ER Patients Likely to Be AdmittedObesity Quadruples Kids' Type 2 Diabetes Risk: StudyAre You Raising an 'Emotional Eater'?More Risks on School Playgrounds Linked to Happier ChildrenKids Face Their Own Death Risks When a Sibling DiesIn America's Poorest Communities, a Greater Risk of Child Abuse DeathsFDA Warns Against Children Taking Codeine, TramadolNext Seven Great Achievements in Pediatric Research PredictedMany Students Reluctant to Use Asthma Inhalers at SchoolDon't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDAMany Kids Still Being Injured on ATVsHypnosis Doesn't Improve Post-Op Anxiety, Pain in ChildrenHealth Tip: Minimizing Violence During Screen TimeHealth Tip: Concerned About Your Child's Weight?What's the Best Seasonal Allergy Med for Your Kid?Web-Based Platform Better for Delivering Pre-Op InformationKids Can Pick Up Nicotine on Their HandsHealth Tip: Checking Your Child's MolesCould a Clinical Trial Help Your Child?Direct-Acting Antivirals Approved for Children 12+ With HCVWhen Families Lack Insurance, Kids' Dental Woes Rise10 Minutes of Sweat a Day Helps Kids' Hearts
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Give Kids a Safe, Stress-Free Holiday

HealthDay News
by -- Mary Elizabeth Dallas
Updated: Dec 21st 2016

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With all the parties, outings and family gatherings during the holidays, it's easy for kids to get overwhelmed or lost in the shuffle, a leading group of pediatricians says.

Amid the hustle and bustle, parents and caregivers should be mindful of children's safety, the American Academy of Pediatrics advises.

While staying in other people's homes, for instance, be aware of potential dangers for little kids, such as decorations that are sharp or breakable. Also watch out for unlocked cabinets, stairways or hot radiators, the doctors' group explains.

Parents and caregivers should also be aware of other risky situations during the holidays. The doctors recommends the following safety tips:

  • Don't wait until the next morning to clean up after a holiday party -- even if it's late. Young children could wake up early and choke on leftovers. They could also find alcohol or tobacco.
  • Be prepared for emergencies. Keep a list of the important phone numbers you or a babysitter might need. This includes police and fire departments, your child's pediatrician and the national Poison Help Line, 1-800-222-1222. It's a good idea to laminate this list to protect it from damage.
  • When traveling by car, children must always be buckled into an appropriate car seat, booster seat or seat belt. If it's very cold, kids should wear thin layers in the car, not a thick coat or snowsuit that might make buckling difficult. You can use a blanket to keep them warm. Adults should set a good example and wear a seatbelt as well. They should also never drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Children can get stressed or anxious when shopping or traveling to visit family or friends. Try to maintain your child's routine as much as possible, sticking to their normal sleep and nap schedules. This can help children enjoy the holidays, too.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more holiday health and safety tips.