24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Obesity Quadruples Kids' Type 2 Diabetes Risk: StudyAre You Raising an 'Emotional Eater'?More Risks on School Playgrounds Linked to Happier ChildrenKids Face Their Own Death Risks When a Sibling DiesIn America's Poorest Communities, a Greater Risk of Child Abuse DeathsFDA Warns Against Children Taking Codeine, TramadolNext Seven Great Achievements in Pediatric Research PredictedMany Students Reluctant to Use Asthma Inhalers at SchoolDon't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDAMany Kids Still Being Injured on ATVsHypnosis Doesn't Improve Post-Op Anxiety, Pain in ChildrenHealth Tip: Minimizing Violence During Screen TimeHealth Tip: Concerned About Your Child's Weight?What's the Best Seasonal Allergy Med for Your Kid?Web-Based Platform Better for Delivering Pre-Op InformationKids Can Pick Up Nicotine on Their HandsHealth Tip: Checking Your Child's MolesCould a Clinical Trial Help Your Child?Direct-Acting Antivirals Approved for Children 12+ With HCVWhen Families Lack Insurance, Kids' Dental Woes Rise10 Minutes of Sweat a Day Helps Kids' HeartsOutdoor Play May Foster Little EnvironmentalistsHealth Tip: Is Your Child Sleeping Enough?Red Cell Distribution Width Predicts Surgical ComplicationsFar Fewer Kids Are Dying Worldwide, but Gains Are UnevenVaccinating Pregnant Moms Protects Babies From Whooping CoughMost U.S. Kids Who Die From Flu Are UnvaccinatedCommon Post-Op Ear Drops Tied to Eardrum Perforations in KidsParents' Pot Use a Tricky Topic When It Comes to Their KidsHealth Tip: Help Your Child with Body ImageLead Exposure as Child, Lower IQ as Adult?Just 17 U.S. States Require Defibrillators in Some SchoolsMany Kids With Diabetes Missing Out on Eye Exams, Study FindsOlder Mothers May Raise Better-Behaved Kids, Study SuggestsHealth Tip: Check Your Child's TemperatureFruit Juice for Kids: A Serving a Day OK'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for Kids'Heads Up' Football Program Tackles Concussion Danger in KidsParents Don't Always Head to Child's Doctor When Illness StrikesSpring-Clean Your Medicine Cabinet to Safeguard Your KidsFewer U.S. Kids Overdosing on OpioidsWhy Some Kids Take Longer to Recover From Brain InjuryNearby Day Cares Don't Pose Health Risks to Kids: StudyObese Moms May Fail to Spot Obesity in Their Own KidsToo Much Screen Time May Raise Kids' Diabetes RiskHealth Tip: Help Kids Maintain Healthy CholesterolMite-Proof Bedding May Help Curb Asthma Attacks: StudyWatchful Waiting Cost-Effective for Pediatric Acute Otitis MediaHealth Tip: Make Sure Kids' Shoes Fit WellCity Tax on Cars Cut Pollution, Kids' Asthma Risk
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Asthma Much More Lethal for Black Children, Study Finds

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 6th 2017

new article illustration

SATURDAY, March 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma attacks can prove deadly to kids, but a new study shows that black American children are six times more likely to die of the illness than their white or Hispanic peers.

The gap in death rates "may imply a differential access to care" based on a family's race, said lead author Dr. Anna Chen Arroyo, in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. She is from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Arroyo was slated to present the findings Saturday at the academy's annual meeting in Atlanta.

There is no cure for asthma, and it can be deadly if not properly controlled through proper diagnosis, medication and a management plan, the authors noted.

One respiratory specialist agreed, and said kids everywhere are affected.

"Asthma is a chronic condition which affects approximately 9 million children in the United States," said Dr. Sherry Farzan, who specializes in allergy and immunology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

"There is a wide range of symptoms and degrees of severity," she added, "with some children having intermittent symptoms, whereas others have chronic daily symptoms with recurrent exacerbations and hospitalizations."

Families can help control a child's asthma through regular access to health care professionals, making sure kids stick with their meds, and cutting down on allergens in the home, Farzan said.

But do all American families have equal access to these measures?

In the new study, Arroyo's team tracked data regarding the asthma deaths of almost 2,600 children nationwide between 2003 and 2014.

The researchers found that just over 50 percent of all the deaths among children with asthma occurred in emergency departments or clinics rather than at home (14 percent) or in a hospital (30 percent).

And in all these locations, black children were more likely to die than any other group of children, the study found.

According to Farzan, this suggests that "health care disparities affect the most vulnerable in our society."

"Further studies must be undertaken to determine which aspects contributing to poor control play a role in this population of patients," she said. "This can inform national measures to help improve the components of asthma control among black children."

Dr. Craig Osleeb is a pediatric allergist at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. He said that while certain genetic or environmental factors might play a role in the higher death risk to black children, "this study may [also] suggest discrepancies in access to care."

These findings were presented at a medical meeting, and they should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on asthma.