24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Resources
Basic Information
Infant Development: How Your Baby Grows and MaturesInfant Parenting: Keeping Your Baby Healthy and HappyInfant Safety: Keeping Your Baby SafeInfant Enrichment: Stimulating Your Baby
More InformationLatest News
Prolonged Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen EczemaEven Partial Breast-Feeding for First Few Months Lowers SIDS RiskHypothermia May Help Newborns With EncephalopathyOb/Gyns Warn Against 'Vaginal Seeding' Trend for NewbornsCDC Updates Zika Guidance for Infant CareTdap Given in Pregnancy Protects Infants From PertussisWhooping Cough Shot Works, But Many Moms-to-Be Skip It: CDCHeart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term BabiesHigher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant DeathsVision Problems Common in Babies Infected With Zika'Modest at Best' Discriminatory Ability for CBC Test in InfantsAnti-Vaccine Info in Pregnancy May Delay Infant ImmunizationAnti-Vaccine Family Members, Friends Spur Many Moms to Delay Baby's ShotsParents of Preemies End Up Just Fine: StudyCharacteristics of Diabetes in Infancy ExploredPicky Eater? It Might Just Be Your Child's PersonalityImpaired Eyesight May Be First Sign of Zika Damage in BabiesTissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDCMany Preemies Don't Struggle in SchoolSpecial Brain Scans May Predict Autism in High-Risk BabiesCan Sharing Your Bedroom With Baby Come With Risks?Does Dad Time With Infants Boost Babies' IQ?Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study SuggestsHealth Tip: Storing Breast Milk SafelyNew Device Approved for Esophageal Birth DefectHappy Mom Means Less Colicky BabyEpilepsy: Another Potential Zika Threat to BabiesRisk of Birth Defects 20 Times Higher for Zika Moms: CDCMost Cow's Milk Baby Formulas Don't Up Risk of Type 1 DiabetesNeurodevelopment at Age 2 Not Worse After ART ConceptionFor a Colicky Baby, You Might Give Acupuncture a TryACOG Recommends Delayed Umbilical Cord ClampingFDA Issues Anesthesia Warning for Pregnant Women, Kids Under 3Birth Defects From Zika More Far-Reaching Than ThoughtStudy Shows How Zika Attacks Infant BrainRare Infant Seizure Disorder Often Missed
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Happy Mom Means Less Colicky Baby

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 28th 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- All babies fuss at times, but crying jags appear less likely when a new mother has strong social support or a loving, helpful partner, researchers report.

In a new study of 3,000 mothers, relationship happiness, a solid support system and an involved partner were found to protect against colic -- defined as crying or fussiness three or more hours a day.

"Maybe the baby cries less if the mom and dad are happier," or mothers in happy relationships may not view their baby's crying negatively and may not report it as colic, suggested study senior author Kristen Kjerulff of Penn State College of Medicine.

Having a supportive partner and receiving support from friends and family were also associated with a lower risk of colic, according to the study.

Study participants, who were 18 to 35 years old, gave birth at 78 hospitals in Pennsylvania between January 2009 and April 2011. Nearly 12 percent of the mothers said their infants were colicky.

However, the happier a woman said she was with her relationship with her partner during and after pregnancy, the lower the risk of colic in her infant. This was true even among women with postpartum depression and among those whose partner was not their baby's biological father, the study reported.

The study also found that babies of single women had the lowest rate of colic. Single women reported having higher levels of general social support, the researchers noted.

"If you don't have a partner, you can still have lots of social support, lots of love and lots of happy relationships, and all of that's going to be better for the baby," said Kjerulff, a professor of public health sciences.

The study can't prove a direct causal relationship between happiness and an easy baby. Still, "love makes a difference," Kjerulff added in a university news release.

Support appears to be key, agreed study first author Dr. Chandran Alexander, an assistant professor of pediatrics.

"Mothers' significant others have a role to play in reducing the burden of colic," Alexander said. "Society should avoid pinning the blame for colic on mothers' competence, self-esteem or depression."

Alexander noted, "We need to impress upon society the importance of supporting families in their care of newborns."

Previous research has linked increased risk of colic with a mother's anxiety and low social support during pregnancy, as well as postpartum depression.

The study results were published recently in the journal Child: Care, Health and Development.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on crying and colic.