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AHA: Heart Health's Impact on Brain May Begin in ChildhoodDisabling Hip Ailment Is Another Health Risk for Obese KidsTry Small 'Bites' to Get Kids to ExerciseCDC Warns of Polio-Like Virus Striking More U.S. KidsCountries That Ban Spanking See Less Teen Violence: StudyHealth Tip: Know the Risks of Chicken PoxKids' Concussion Symptoms May Persist for a YearAdd Asthma to List of Possible Causes of Childhood ObesityHealth Tip: Teach Your Kids ToleranceHealth Tip: Treat Your Child's AllergiesMore Evidence Video Games May Trigger Aggression in KidsDeath Rates for Young Americans Drop, But Still Too HighJust Witnessing School Violence Can Leave Psychic ScarsGrowing Up Poor May Permanently Damage Thinking SkillsFast Foods' Healthier Options Might Not Help Kids Eat BetterBrief Exercise Breaks During Class Help Bodies, BrainsCan Too Much Screen Time Dumb Down Your Kid?Booster Shots Safe for Most Kids Who Have Vaccine Reaction: Study5 Tips to Manage Your Child's AsthmaMom-to-Be's High-Gluten Diet Linked to Type 1 Diabetes in BabyHealth Tip: Protect Your Child's HearingCould Household Cleaners Make Your Kid Fat?Picky Eating May Mask Larger IssuesMore Water, Mom? H2O Is Top Kids' Beverage in U.S.How to Reassure Kids When Florence StrikesNew Drug Could Help Kids With MSAHA: Get Your (Exer)game On to Make Screen Time Pay OffHealth Tip: Connect With Your ChildKids Without Access to Good Food Face High Blood Pressure RiskIVF May Put Children at Risk for High Blood PressureHealth Tip: Protect Your Child After Pet ExposureHomelessness Takes Toll on Kids' Health Even Before They're BornAll Children Should Receive Flu Vaccine ASAP, Doctors AdviseEarly Eye Checks for Kids a Smart MoveUndescended Testes Tied to Higher Risk of Cancer, InfertilityHealth Tip: Buy the Right Backpack for Your ChildTeaching Your Kids Online SafetyExpert Advice for a Safe Trip Back to SchoolHealth Tip: Pack a Healthy Lunch for Your ChildAs U.S. Kids Take More Meds, Dangerous Drug Mixes Could RiseHere's Food for Thought -- and School SuccessPut Good Health on Your Child's Back-to-School ChecklistHealth Tip: Prevent Childhood ObesityHow to Prevent Your Child From Getting Bullied -- or Being a BullyWhen Kids Focus on 1 Sport, Overuse Injuries RiseWhen a Parent Has Cancer, Kids Suffer Long Term: StudyGetting Kids Ready for the New School Year4 Ways to Protect Your Child From Allergic Reactions at SchoolA Weak Grip May Signal Future Health Trouble -- Even in KidsNo Link Between Tdap Vaccine, Autism: Study
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ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Health Tip: Prevent Exposure to Lead


HealthDay News
Updated: Feb 12th 2018

(HealthDay News) -- Lead exposure has been linked to problems including reduced IQ, focus and academic performance. So every effort should be made to prevent lead exposure in the home, particularly among children.

Lead-based paint was banned for use in American homes in 1978, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. But older homes may still pose a danger.

The CDC suggests how to reduce the risk to you and your children:

  • Talk to your state or local health department about testing paint and dust for lead.
  • Make sure your child does not have access to peeling paint or chewable surfaces containing lead-based paint.
  • Children and pregnant women should not be present in a home built before 1978 that is being renovated. They also should not participate in cleaning up paint debris after work is completed.
  • Regularly wash children's hands and toys. They may be contaminated from household dust or outside soil, either of which may contain lead.
  • Regularly wet mop floors and wet wipe all window surfaces, including sills and wells.
  • Prevent children from playing directly in soil.