24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Health Tip: What to Do if You Scratch Your EyeDoes Salt Water Help Your Cut? And Other Health Myths of SummerObesity's a Larger Problem in Rural AmericaDiabetes Linked to Risk for Parkinson's Disease60 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon OutbreakSurgical Blood Transfusions Tied to Clot RiskWhy Are Statins Underused With Black Patients?U.S. Obesity Rates Rising AgainHealth Tip: Caring for a Minor BurnCould You Have Rosacea?Kitchen Towels Laden With BacteriaWalkable Neighborhoods Might Lower Kids' Asthma RiskWind Turbines' Health Impact Still Up in the AirAllergies More Common in Kids With AutismHealth Tip: Breathe Easier in a Volcano ZoneThink Twice About Tonsil, Adenoid RemovalColonoscopies, Endoscopies Carry Greater Infection Risk Than Thought: StudyYour Tummy Rumblings Might Help Diagnose Bowel DisorderHealth Tip: Three Weight Stats That Can Predict HealthHealth Tip: What To Expect From Joint Replacement SurgeryNon-Drug Migraine Treatments Often IgnoredTips for Handling a Medical EmergencyYes, You Can Put Too Much Chlorine in a PoolA Nasty Germ That Can Lurk in Favorite FoodsFirst Artificial Iris is ApprovedNew Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis ApprovedThe ER or Urgent Care?Widely Used Antibacterial Tied to Colon Woes in MiceAnother Drug to Prevent Migraines Shows PromiseNew Treatment Approved for Rare Disease PKULittle Follow-Up for Many Concussion PatientsBe Smart When It Comes to Spring Allergies and AsthmaCoal Miners Face Growing Wave of Black Lung DiseaseTo Repel Ticks This Summer, Try Insecticide-Treated ClothesNewly Identified Form of Vertigo Responds to TreatmentSevere Eczema May Be Linked to Heart Disease RiskHealth Tip: How to Get Rid of an Embedded TickEven at 'Safe' Levels, Air Pollution Puts Seniors at RiskSmall World? Not With One-Quarter Obese by 2045IBD Associated With Increased Risk of Parkinson's DiseaseBlue's Clues: Adding Dye to Colonoscopy May Boost DetectionHealth Concerns Rise Along With Hawaii EruptionsFDA OKs Doptelet for Liver Dz Patients Undergoing ProceduresEven a Mosquito's Spit May Help Make You SickFDA Approves Aimovig to Prevent MigrainesLower Vitamin D levels Linked to More Belly FatCan the Mediterranean Diet Protect Against Smog-Related Deaths?Many Parents Say Restaurant Fare Has Made Kids Sick: PollVarious Clinical Disturbances Precede MS DiagnosisFDA Approves First Drug Aimed at Preventing Migraines
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Cutting Out Gluten May Help Some Battle Nerve Pain

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 28th 2018

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A sensitivity to gluten in the diet has been tied to the nerve damage known as neuropathy, and a new study seems to strengthen that link.

The research showed that a gluten-free diet may help reduce nerve pain in some people with gluten sensitivity.

"These findings are exciting because it might mean that a relatively simple change in diet could help alleviate painful symptoms tied to gluten neuropathy," study lead author Dr. Panagiotis Zis, of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

His group plans to present the findings in April at the AAN's annual meeting in Los Angeles.

One neurologist explained the range of health issues tied to gluten.

While it may seem that millions of Americans are avoiding gluten in their diets, Dr. Sami Saba, a neurologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, noted that -- based on testing -- just 1 percent of Americans are truly "gluten sensitive."

Gluten sensitivity is evidenced by the presence of immune-system antibodies to gluten in blood tests, or having symptoms of gluten sensitivity even in the absence of antibodies, Saba said.

Gluten sensitivity is different from celiac disease, which is confirmed through a number of tests, he noted.

"More and more, it's thought of as a spectrum of disease as opposed to one easily defined disease," said Saba, who was not involved in the new study.

And according to Zis and his colleagues, prior research has linked gluten sensitivity with nerve damage in the hands and feet, resulting in symptoms such as weakness, numbness and pain -- a condition called gluten neuropathy.

"What we don't know," said Saba, "is if those with gluten sensitivity and painful neuropathy get better if they follow a gluten-free diet, or if those with a painless neuropathy can develop pain if they start eating gluten again."

The study included 60 people, average age 70, with diagnosed gluten neuropathy. More than half also had neuropathy-related pain.

What people ate did seem to matter, the researchers found. While 56 percent of the patients without pain were on a gluten-free diet, that was true for just 21 percent of those who were experiencing pain.

After adjusting for other factors -- such as age, sex and mental health -- the researchers concluded that following a strict gluten-free diet was associated with an 89 percent lower risk of pain.

Still, Zis stressed that while the study "shows an association between a self-reported gluten-free diet and less pain, it does not show that one causes the other." He believes that "more research is needed to confirm these results and to determine whether the gluten-free diet led to the reduction in pain."

Dr. Anthony Geraci directs the Neuromuscular Center at Northwell Health's Neuroscience Institute in Manhasset, N.Y.

He wasn't involved in the new study, but agreed that adopting a gluten-free diet may help some, but not all, patients with neuropathies linked to gluten issues.

"Trying a gluten-free diet in patients with painful neuropathy is a reasonable intervention as we await further larger and well-controlled studies to learn more about this spectrum of disorders," said Geraci.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on gluten sensitivity.