24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Drug Combo Does Double Duty Against Common Skin Lesions, CancersBe Prepared to Take FAST Action If You Suspect a StrokeHeart Risks Vary Among Asian-AmericansAHA News: Emphysema May Raise Risk of Ruptured AneurysmsNew Facial Bone Might Someday Be Grown From the Patient's RibWhat Works Best for Women Struggling With a Leaky Bladder?Your Apple Watch Might Help Spot a Dangerous Irregular HeartbeatDocs Back Away From Low-Dose Aspirin for Heart Attack PreventionAHA News: Overweight Kids at Higher Risk for Blood Clots as AdultsEbola Survivors Continue to Suffer Years After RecoveryFewer Boys Are Suffering Head Injuries, But Rate Rises for GirlsAHA News: Black Woman in Their 50s Face Especially High Stroke RiskNew Drug Could Help Those With Tough-to-Treat CholesterolWhen Can Kids Return to Play After a Concussion?Need to Be Vaccinated? Try Your Local PharmacyOne-Third of U.S. Kids Have Back Pain, Study SaysBlacks, Hispanics Bear Burden of Air Pollution: StudyChickens Help Scientists Pinpoint Origin of Rare, Deadly VirusDry Eye and Migraines Might Be Linked: StudySkin Fungi May Be Tied to Bowel DiseaseYo-Yo Dieting Can Take a Toll on Your HeartAHA News: Opioid Meds Pose Danger to Kidney Disease PatientsHealth Tip: UTI Warning SignsStaph Infections Drop, but Levels Still Worry U.S. Health OfficialsTreatment May Allow Allergic Kids to Eat Eggs Safely: StudyAcne Drug Accutane May Not Depress Mood After AllHealth Tip: Preventing Carpal TunnelMajor Flooding Can Bring Skin Infection DangersSmall Trial Provides New Hope Against Parkinson's DiseaseIs Your Hand Pain Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel or Something Else?California Parents Are Getting Around Vaccine Law, Fueling Measles OutbreaksSeniors With UTIs Need Antibiotics ASAP, Study SaysWhy Do Some Kids With Eczema Develop Food Allergies?High-Fiber Diet May Help Gut 'Microbiome' Battle MelanomaTick Bites More Likely to Cause Red Meat Allergy Than ThoughtWalking, Not Riding, Boosts Health in Golfers With Knee WoesIs At-Home Stool Test a Viable Alternative to Colonoscopy?After Peanut Allergy Rx, Eating Small Bits of Peanut Might Help: StudyA Hard Look at Smoking's Effect on VisionPeanut Allergy Patch Shows Middling Results in TrialToxins in Home Furnishings Can Be Passed on to KidsKratom-Related Poisonings Are Soaring, Study FindsFDA Aims to Strengthen Sunscreen RulesBrain Condition CTE Seen in H.S. Football Players: StudyPregnant Women Should Delay Gallbladder Surgery, Study FindsGut Microbes May Help Drive Lupus, Study FindsMost Hip, Knee Replacements Last Decades, Study FindsAHA News: Living Near Convenience Stores Could Raise Risk of Artery-Clogging ConditionPossible Parkinson's 'Pandemic' Looms: Report'Apple-Shaped' Body? 'Pear-Shaped'? Your Genes May Tell
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

1 in 4 People Over 25 Will Be Hit by Stroke

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Dec 20th 2018

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A quarter of the world's people over the age of 25 will experience a debilitating stroke during their lifetime, a new study estimates.

Rates vary country to country, but in the United States 23 percent to 29 percent of people can expect a stroke sometime in their lives, concluded a team led by Dr. Gregory Roth.

He's professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington, in Seattle.

"These findings suggest that adults need to think about their long-term health risks, including stroke, at a much younger age," Roth said.

For the new report, Roth and his colleagues used data from the Global Burden of Disease study to estimate the lifetime risk for having a stroke for those over the age of 25.

The investigators looked at the two major forms of stroke: ischemic strokes, caused by clots, which make up about 85 percent of strokes; and strokes caused by bleeding in the brain, called hemorrhagic strokes, which make up about 15 percent. The data came from 195 countries and spanned the years 1990 to 2016.

Looking at 2016 data, Roth's team found that the risk of stroke for people over the age of 25 ranged from 8 percent to 39 percent, depending on where in the world they lived. The Chinese had the highest risk (with more than a 39 percent lifetime risk), followed by people in Central and Eastern Europe. The lowest risk was among those living in sub-Saharan Africa.

Gender didn't seem to matter, with no significant differences in stroke risk seen between men and women, according to the report.

A person's odds for a stroke rise with certain risk factors, including obesity, smoking and lack of exercise. So the new findings could help public health agencies around the world boost their public education efforts, Roth suggested.

For example, programs that encourage young adults to exercise and eat healthier diets (more fruits, vegetables and whole grains) are needed, Roth said. So are efforts that help young adults avoid smoking or excessive drinking.

"Physicians should warn their patients at a much earlier age about actions they can take to prevent stroke and other vascular diseases later in life," Roth said.

Governments can also work to lower prices on blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering medicines, the researchers noted.

Dr. Richard Libman is vice chair of neurology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. He said, "Stroke remains a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. On a large scale, prevention of stroke before it ever occurs may be even more crucial in certain geographic areas, although no region is exempt from this debilitating condition."

The report was published Dec. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

More information

The American Stroke Association has more about stroke prevention.