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If You're Diabetic, Foot Care a Must

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Dec 26th 2018

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Good foot care is essential for people with diabetes, a foot surgeon says.

Diabetes can cause nerve damage that leads to a loss of sensation in the feet, making it difficult to feel any sores, blisters or injuries, explained Dr. John Giurini. He is chief of podiatric surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

Diabetes can also reduce blood supply to the feet, making it difficult for injuries to heal.

People with diabetes should regularly inspect their feet, Giurini said. The best time is immediately after a shower while drying your feet or at the end of the day when removing socks and shoes.

If you notice a blister, apply a clean dressing with an antiseptic, stay off the foot, and contact your podiatrist or physician, Giurini said in a medical center news release.

Inspect the insides of your shoes before putting them on, for things such as rocks, pebbles and other debris that can cause irritation of the foot. Due to a lack of sensation in your feet, you may not be able to feel these objects, he explained.

High-risk patients should be seen by a foot care specialist every three months, Giurini said. High-risk patients include those with abnormal sensation or circulation, or those with foot deformities.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more on foot care.