24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Easy Eggs for a Nutritious BreakfastAttention, Seniors: Drink More Water and Head Off DiseaseHow to Spice Up Your Spring SaladDrinks to Help You Kick Your Soda HabitStay Away From Sugary Sodas, Spare Your HeartKnives: Essential Equipment for Healthy Food PrepHealthy Cooking on a BudgetHeart-Breaking News for Egg LoversAre Enhanced Waters Better for Your Health?Spring Ahead With Spring VegetablesThe Saturated Fat Debate Rages OnHealthy Diet Might Not Lower Dementia RiskDoes Your Family Eat Out a Lot? Watch Your Blood PressureNutritional Supplements Don't Ward Off Depression: StudySlow Down! Eating Too Fast Can Pile on the PoundsTry This Healthy Makeover for a Favorite Fast FoodHealthy Diet While Young, Healthy Brain in Middle AgeHow to Get Your Calcium If You're Lactose-IntolerantWhen it Comes to Diet, Not All Plants Are Created EqualRecipe for a Healthy Heart: Big Breakfasts, Less TVThe Right Way to Cook High-Antioxidant VeggiesLow-Carb Diets Linked to Higher Odds for A-FibHow Much Coffee Is OK?Health Tip: Foods that Reduce InflammationSocial Media 'Influencers' Can Get Kids Eating Junk FoodFast Food Delivers Even More Calories Than Decades AgoCooking With Whole GrainsEasy Recipes for Your Food ProcessorThe 411 on Nutritious, Tasty SeedsAdding Breakfast to Classrooms May Have a Health DownsideSupermarket Smarts: How to Save Money and Eat BetterBerkeley's Efforts Suggest Soda Taxes Do Cut Soda SalesGo Nuts Over NutsFast Food Versus Fast Casual -- Which Has More Calories?High-Fat Diets Do No Favors for Your Gut BacteriaHealth Tip: 10 Ways to Encourage Kids to Eat HealthierHealth Tip: Eat Less SaltRoasted Root Veggies Make a Hearty Winter SoupAHA News: Living Near Convenience Stores Could Raise Risk of Artery-Clogging ConditionHealth Tip: Eat Less Saturated FatKid-Friendly Food Swaps Everyone Will LoveWill Sugar Substitutes Help You Lose Weight?How to Keep Food Poisoning at BayHow to Choose the Right Cooking OilsCould Diet Sodas Raise an Older Woman's Stroke Risk?Hydrate Right, Your Kidneys Will Thank YouSweet Valentine Treats That Won't Bust Your DietAHA News: Are There Health Benefits From Chocolate?Get The Most From Frozen VegetablesUpdate Dietary Guidelines for a Healthier You
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

Are TV Cereal Ads Making Your Kids Fat?

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jan 11th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to children," said Jennifer Emond, a member of the cancer control research program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, in Lebanon, N.H.

"Brands specifically target children in their advertising knowing that children will ask their parents for those products," Emond said in a medical center news release.

While laboratory studies have shown that TV ads influence children's food choices, no real-world study has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of TV food ads on children's eating habits, according to Emond.

"We conducted the first longitudinal study among preschool-age children to see how exposure to TV ads for high-sugar cereals influences kids' subsequent intake of those advertised cereals," she said.

Emond and colleagues counted, by brand, cereal ads on TV shows watched by the children. Every eight weeks, for one year, parents were asked about the shows their children watched and what cereals their kids ate in the past week.

"We found that kids who were exposed to TV ads for high-sugar cereals aired in the programs they watched were more likely to subsequently eat the cereals they had seen advertised," Emond said.

"Our models accounted for several child, parent and household characteristics, and whether the child ate each cereal before the study started. We were able to isolate the effect of cereal advertisement exposure on kids' intake of cereals, independent of all of those other factors," she explained.

The study was published online recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Reducing the marketing of high-sugar foods to children could improve their eating habits and reduce their risk of obesity and related chronic diseases later in life, Emond said.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on nutrition.