24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Health Tip: Which Foods to WashPoor Diet Might Raise Your Cancer RiskEating to Reach Health GoalsTry This Whole-Grain Lemony Quick BreadHealth Tip: Effects of Too Much ProteinHealthy Food May Boost MoodMelons Are Powerhouses in Taste, NutritionThe Top 5 Veggies to Add to Your DietSugary Drinks and Fruit Juice May Increase Risk of Early DeathEssentials for Growing Tasty Herbs on Your WindowsillAre Diets High in Processed Foods a Recipe for Obesity?The Top 5 Fruits to Add to Your DietLow-Fat Diet Could Be a Weapon Against Breast CancerThe Handy Tool for Healthy ChipsNot All Sugars Are Created EqualBrighten Your Breakfast With a Lighter Blueberry MuffinAHA News: This May Be Why Slashing Salt Lowers Blood PressureHow to Cook With Luscious LentilsBody Adapts, Recovers From Occasional 'Pigging Out,' Study FindsHomemade Mayonnaise Made EasyHow Much Protein Do You Need for Weight Loss and Muscle Growth?Drinking and Your Health: A Reality CheckHealth Tip: Drink Enough WaterAHA News: Could Adding Minerals to Drinking Water Fight High Blood Pressure?A Tasty Twist on Pasta and PestoAs Finals Draw Near, College Kids' Diets WorsenA Heart-Healthy Prescription for America's Food SystemDiet Sodas May Not Help Kids Cut CaloriesCould You Be Short on Vitamin B12?An Expert's Guide to Healthier Grocery ShoppingA Celebration Salad Fit for a Queen or KingYoung Adults Flocking to Energy DrinksMeal Swaps That Save 200 CaloriesHow to Make a Powerhouse SmoothieBetter Food Assistance Programs Might Lower Childhood Obesity RatesHealth Tip: Protein For VegansGinger: A Flavorful and Healing RootCould Common Food Preservative Make People Fat?E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Ground Beef Expands to 10 StatesDo-It-Yourself Veggie NoodlesThe Benefits of an Anti-Inflammatory DietVeggies, Fruits and Grains Keep Your Heart PumpingSkipping Breakfast Could Be a Bad Move for Your HeartMany U.S. Kids Don't Drink Enough Water, and Obesity May Be the ResultAsparagus: A Tasty Spring Veggie That Boosts Gut HealthFennel: A Food Lover's Dream IngredientNew Evidence That Veggies Beat Steak for Heart Health4 Superfoods to Put on Your Menu Today'Added Sugars' Label on Foods Could Save Many LivesEasy, Delicious Recipes From Your Blender
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

Is Your Workplace Making You Fat?

HealthDay News
by By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jan 23rd 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Candy dishes, cupcakes and cookies abound in the typical office, so if you're striving to eat healthy, the workplace can be a culinary minefield.

Researchers surveyed more than 5,000 people and found that about one in four working adults said they got food or beverages from work at least once a week. Many of those foods were high in calories, processed grains, and added sugar and salt, according to scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"People should probably be concerned about all the foods they're getting at work. So many of them are free, but people don't realize that all those free foods do add up to a lot of calories over the week. And, those calories don't necessarily line up well with [healthy] dietary guidelines," said study author Stephen Onufrak. He's an epidemiologist with the CDC's nutrition division.

The study reported that the average worker ate about 1,300 calories of foods obtained at the office every week.

Foods consumed at work included those purchased from vending machines or cafeterias, as well as those eaten for free in common areas, meetings or worksite social events.

Among the top 10 items obtained at work -- either free or purchased -- were coffee, water, soft drinks, sandwiches and potato chips, the study found.

The highest calorie items people got at work -- free or purchased -- included pizza, soft drinks, sandwiches, chips, cookies, brownies, donuts, pastries and burgers.

"Since so many of these foods were free, workplaces can adopt healthy meeting policies that encourage healthy foods that are more in line with workplace wellness efforts," Onufrak said. He added that workplace wellness programs are effective at reducing workplace costs and absenteeism.

Dietitian Samantha Heller said people definitely underestimate the calories they eat at work. "You don't think much about it if you grab a bag of chips in the break room, but that's 150 calories. And if you do it three or four days a week for months, those calories really start to add up," she said.

And the ubiquitous office candy dish? "You grab a pre-wrapped chocolate or two as you walk by and think nothing of the calories," Heller added. "But if you do that a few times every day, slowly those extra calories will put on the pounds."

If your office provides food in meetings, break rooms or a cafeteria, Heller suggested that you ask whoever does the ordering to include some healthy selections.

She also advised that just because cookies and other treats at work are free, it doesn't mean that you have to eat them.

"We don't like to turn down free food, but there are many days it's going to be someone's work anniversary or birthday. You don't have to eat something to celebrate with them," Heller said.

It's easier to forgo office goodies if you're not hungry, she noted. "If you're not hungry, you're more in control," Heller said. "If you can, bring healthy food to work with you."

The study findings were published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advice on improving your eating habits.