24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
AHA News: Where There's Wildfire Smoke, There May Be Heart ProblemsHealth Tip: Symptoms of Tennis ElbowHealth Tip: Protecting Yourself From Summer BugsMusic Soothes the Stressed Soul Before SurgeryHey! That's the Wrong Knee, Doctor15 Minutes Matters With StrokesAs Heat Bakes the Nation, Expert Offers Tips to Stay SafeThe 'Bottom' Blood Pressure Number Matters, TooAnother Study Casts Doubt on Safety of Herbal Drug KratomWHO Declares Congo Ebola Outbreak a 'Global Health Emergency'New Test Can Pinpoint Which Pancreatic Cysts Might Turn CancerousChinese Scientists Cut Local Numbers of Dangerous Mosquito by 94%Health Tip: Recognizing Heat ExhaustionInsect Stings Are Just a Buzzkill for Most FolksDisinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital GermHealth Tip: Working in Extreme HeatHealth Tip: Diarrhea in KidsHow to Protect Your DNA for Big Health BenefitsNewer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More LivesHigh Blood Pressure, 'Bad' Cholesterol Risky for Young, TooSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingMany Pneumonia Patients Get Too Many AntibioticsAdopt a Diet That's Good for Your GutAHA News: 5 Threats to Heart Health You May Not Be Aware OfTongue, Lip Snip Surgeries May Be Overused in U.S. NewbornsHealth Tip: Foods With LactoseHealth Tip: Living With Celiac DiseaseMore Evidence Fried Food Ups Heart Disease, Stroke RiskBrain Injury Often a Devastating Side Effect of Domestic ViolenceNew Migraine Drug Might Help When Other Meds Don'tXpovio With Dexamethasone Approved for Refractory Multiple MyelomaPoor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's BonesIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before BirthCDC Warns of Start to 'Season' for Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in KidsShould You Try Allergen Immunotherapy?Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients HomeMore Evidence Supplements Won't Help the Heart'Semi-Slug' Is Spreading a Lethal Parasite in HawaiiAHA News: 'Surprising' Lack of Progress on Heart Disease in Younger AdultsSmall Vessel Disease Leaves Patients Vulnerable to Leg AmputationHealth Tip: Eating Out If You Have a Food AllergyHow to Create a Diet That Lowers Your CholesterolHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageSurgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm MovementIt's Mosquito Season: Here's How to Protect YourselfConcussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football PlayerOften Feel Bloated? One Ingredient May Be to BlameFor Many, Pot Is Now an Alternative to Opioids or Sleep MedsSurgery Helps Babies Missing a Heart Chamber Survive, But Problems Linger
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

A Good Spring Clean Can Help Tame Seasonal Allergies

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 25th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it's finally time to store away your winter coats and boots, it's also a good time to rid your home of the allergens that accumulated over the winter, an allergist suggests.

"If you aren't someone who regularly undertakes spring cleaning, consider tackling it this year," said Dr. Todd Mahr, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"A thorough cleaning helps get rid of things like dust, mold, pet dander and other allergens, which may have been making you miserable all winter. Many people think spring and fall is when their seasonal allergies kick in. They might not realize indoor allergens can also cause chaos with your nasal passages and lungs and that a thorough cleaning can help," Mahr explained in an ACAAI news release.

Pet dander, fur and saliva are among the allergens that can build up during winter. The best way to control them is to vacuum often and wash upholstery, including your pet's bed. Never let your pet in the bedroom.

Change your air filters every three months and choose ones with a MERV rating of 11 or 12, Mahr advised. Fight dust mites by vacuuming regularly with a cyclonic vacuum -- which spins dust and dirt away from the floor -- or one equipped with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter. Wash bedding and stuffed animals weekly.

Mold is another major indoor allergen typically found in the basement, bathroom and kitchen. Reducing moisture is the key to eliminating it. Use bathroom fans and always wipe away any standing water immediately. Use detergent and water to scrub visible mold from surfaces, and then dry surfaces completely. Keep your home's humidity below 60 percent and clean your gutters regularly to prevent leaks.

As tempting as that fresh, warm air outside is, keep your home's windows closed during spring, Mahr suggested, because breezes can bring pollen through open windows. Keep your car windows closed too; use your air conditioning.

Mahr pointed out that allergy symptoms can appear before spring actually arrives. By starting to take your allergy medications two to three weeks before symptoms usually begin, you can avoid severe symptoms. If over-the-counter allergy medicines don't help, talk with an allergist, he said.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on spring allergies.