24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Health Tip: Taking a Mental Health DayAre You Just a Worrywart or Is It Something More?Online Learning: What's in It for You?10 Quick Tips for a Healthier, Safer LifeHow to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent FracturesHow Your Genes Affect the Number on Your ScaleFitter Bodies Make for Healthier Brains, Study FindsOccasional Naps Do a Heart Good, Swiss Study FindsAHA News: Less TV, More Activity May Mean Extra Years Free of Heart Disease and StrokeDark Skin No Protection Against Sun's Harmful RaysLong-Term 'Couch Potatoes' May Face Double the Odds for Early DeathPersonality Reboots Are Possible, Studies SuggestStaying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study ShowsHow to Get on Track When Weekend Eating Is Your DownfallEvery Minute of Exercise Counts When It Comes to LongevityHow Helpful Are Self-Help Programs?City Parks Are a Mood BoosterThe 4 Keys to Emotional Well-BeingDo You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?Are You an 'Extreme Early Bird'?Unplugging From Social Media on Vacation? It's Tough at FirstHow to Kickstart Your CreativityWhat TV Binge-Watching Does to Your BrainGiving Up Meat Could Help Your Health -- And the Planet'sHeart-Healthy Habits Good For Your BrainFast-Food Joints on Your Way to Work? Your Waistline May WidenPlants on Your Plate Will Protect Your Heart3 Ways to Improve Your Eating Habits4 Tips for a Healthier Home4 Personal Items You Probably Should Replace TodayTrees an Oasis of Mental Well-BeingSome Meds and Driving a Dangerous DuoAmericans Are Spending Even More Time Sitting, Study ShowsCan Your Smartphone Make You Fat?Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each YearWarm Bath Can Send You Off to a Sound Slumber, Study FindsAHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer HeatSunglasses a Shield for the EyesToo Much Smartphone Time May Invite Host of Health WoesThe Happiness Dividend: Longer, Healthier LivesSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingJust 300 Fewer Calories a Day Brings a Health BenefitCan a Budget Make You Happier?Sleep : The Right Prescription for Your HealthIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time TogetherHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageHealth Tip: Wear Sunglasses With UV ProtectionHow Are You Feeling? Check Your WristbandSelfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Cover Up! Don't Soak Up Those Sun Rays

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 10th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found.

Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers.

One in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their life, the AAD estimates. Just one serious sunburn in childhood or the teen years can nearly double a person's risk of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, later in life.

Because May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, the AAD is encouraging Americans to "practice safe sun."

"Exposure to the sun's harmful UV rays is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, and there are many simple things you can do to protect yourself from the sun," AAD President Dr. George Hruza said in an academy news release.

Seek shade when possible, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. when the sun's rays are strongest.

Wear protective clothing, such as a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses.

Apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to all skin not covered by clothing. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or sweating.

"It's also important to remember to protect parts of your body you think might not be getting any sun," Hruza said.

"Areas like the tops of your hands, bottoms of your feet or the part in your hair may not immediately come to mind when it comes to sun protection, but they are still vulnerable to dangerous sun damage," he explained.

Skin cancer is highly treatable when caught early, so it's important to do regular skin self-exams and look out for ABCDEs -- the warning signs of melanoma:

  • Asymmetry: One half of the spot is unlike the other half.
  • Border: The spot has an irregular, scalloped or poorly defined border.
  • Color: The spot has varying colors from one area to the next, such as shades of tan, brown or black, or areas of white, red or blue.
  • Diameter: Melanomas are usually greater than 6 millimeters (about the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, but they can be smaller.
  • Evolving: The spot looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color.

"If you find any new or suspicious spots on your skin, make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist," Hruza said. "Spots that are changing, itching or bleeding could be a sign of skin cancer, and the earlier skin cancer is detected, the easier it is to treat."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on skin cancer.