24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Heading to Europe This Summer? Get Your Measles ShotAiling Heart Can Speed the Brain's Decline, Study FindsHealth Tip: Preventing GlaucomaHead Injuries Tied to Motorized Scooters Are Rising: StudyOverweight Kids Are at Risk for High Blood PressureHot Water Soak May Help Ease Poor Leg CirculationHealth Tip: Understanding RosaceaHealth Tip: Causes of Swollen Lymph NodesAHA News: Study Provides Rare Look at Stroke Risk, Survival Among American IndiansCDC Opens Emergency Operations Center for Congo Ebola OutbreakScared Safe: Pics of Sun's Damage to Face Boost Sunscreen UseNo Needle Prick: Laser-Based Test Hunts Stray Melanoma Cells in BloodBats Are Biggest Rabies Danger, CDC SaysEmgality Receives First FDA Approval for Treating Cluster HeadacheZerbaxa Approved for Hospital-Acquired Bacterial PneumoniaBlood From Previously Pregnant Women Is Safe for Donation: StudyStudy Refutes Notion That People on Warfarin Shouldn't Eat Leafy GreensCancer Survivors Predicted to Top 22 Million by 2030Your Guide to a Healthier Home for Better Asthma ControlHigh Blood Pressure at Doctor's Office May Be More Dangerous Than SuspectedAHA News: 3 Simple Steps Could Save 94 Million Lives WorldwideHealth Tip: Dealing With Motion SicknessHealth Tip: Symptoms of MeningitisRace Affects Life Expectancy in Major U.S. CitiesVitamin D Supplements Don't Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: StudyChickenpox Vaccine Shields Kids From Shingles, TooWhooping Cough Vaccine Effectiveness Fades With Time: StudyOpioids Put Alzheimer's Patients at Risk of Pneumonia: StudyHealth Tip: Early Signs of Lyme DiseaseHealth Tip: Hiccup Home RemediesSheep Study Shows a Stuffy Side Effect of VapingShould Air Quality Checks Be Part of Your Travel Planning?Health Tip: Preventing Swimmer's EarHeartburn Drugs Again Tied to Fatal RisksHealth Tip: Nasal Spray SafetyFDA Approves First Drug to Help Tame Cluster HeadachesMany Dietary Supplements Dangerous for TeensAverage American Ingests 70,000 Bits of Microplastic Each YearFalls Are Increasingly Lethal for Older AmericansChicken No Better Than Beef for Your Cholesterol?Another Use for Beta Blockers? Curbing A-fibCaffeine, Nicotine Withdrawal Can Cause Problems in the ICU: StudyYounger Gout Patients Have Higher Odds for Blood ClotsFDA Approves First Test for Zika in Human BloodCDC Warns Again of Salmonella From Pet HedgehogsWhy Some Kids With Eczema Are at Higher Allergy RiskMany Heart Failure Patients Might Safely Reduce Use of DiureticsU.S. Measles Cases for 2019 Already Exceed All Annual Totals Since 1992: CDCForget Fasting Before That Cholesterol TestU.S. Cancer Cases, Deaths Continue to Fall
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Could You Have a Sensitive Gut?

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 29th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, May 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you've ever wondered why emotional distress causes stomach cramps or a mad dash to the bathroom, know that there's a direct line of communication that runs from your brain to your digestive tract.

It's called the enteric nervous system, and it can have a powerful effect.

For instance, when you feel nervous or threatened, digestion can slow or stop so that your body can focus on functions with higher priority -- and that might result in cramps or diarrhea. This is a hallmark of the condition called irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS.

The brain-gut connection works in both directions. For example, having a digestive condition can make you anxious or cause emotional distress. Plus, that anxiety can then worsen your digestive symptoms.

Researchers recently found a connection between depression and the absence of certain good gut bacteria -- they can't yet say which comes first, but it's clear that there's some type of relationship.

If your gut reacts negatively to emotions and it's affecting your life, talk to your doctor. Find out if you have a digestive issue that's causing physical as well as emotional stress, such as IBS, and take steps to treat it. These may involve changes to your diet and other lifestyle habits.

Know that the answer doesn't always have to include drug therapy. To master anxiety regardless of its source, you can tap into relaxation techniques or psychological therapies, from progressive muscle relaxation, relaxation therapy, visualization and soothing music to cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnotherapy or even gut-directed relaxation training, a technique that pairs relaxation with thinking positive thoughts centered on your gut.

More information

The International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders has more on relaxation techniques.