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Wellness and Personal Development

Say Cheers to Lighter Summer Drinks

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jun 3rd 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Want to celebrate longer days and warmer nights with fewer calories? Try these smart ways to cut the calories from favorite cocktails.

If you're a daiquiri diehard, skip the packaged mixers and sugary concentrates. Make your own daiquiri base with naturally sweet-tasting berries. To 1 cup of ice, add 1 cup of any berries, cherries or combination and 1 teaspoon of the sweetener of your choice, followed by a shot of rum. You'll get extra fiber and a bigger portion and save hundreds of calories as you sip.

Love chilled white wine? The average 5-ounce glass is around 120 calories, but you can half the calories by making your own wine spritzer. The formula is simple: Mix equal parts sparkling water and wine, then add crushed raspberries or cherries.

Who doesn't like a good margarita? If you want one that's not overly sweet but still has the tang of fresh juice, this tasty margarita with real pomegranate juice fits the bill with an instant 100 to 200 calorie savings.

Pomegranate Margarita

  • 1 cup ice
  • 16 ounces pomegranate juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 2 ounces tequila
  • 1 ounce Cointreau (or orange-flavored liqueur)
  • 1 tablespoon sweetener of your choice
  • Lime wedges
  • Salt to taste

Combine the ice, juices, tequila, Cointreau and sweetener in a blender and process to a slushy consistency.

Swipe the rims of four margarita glasses with a lime wedge and then dip glasses into salt. Fill each glass with the slush, garnish with lime wedges and serve immediately.

Yield: 4 servings

More information

To help you be more aware of the true content of alcoholic beverages, Rethinking Drinking has calculators that show how many calories are in common drinks.