24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
AHA News: A Nutritious Side Dish to Grill This Memorial DayAHA News: Cooking More at Home? Diverse Food Cultures Can Expand Heart-Healthy MenuEven One High-Fat Meal May Dull Your MindToo Many Sugary Sodas Might Harm Your KidneysCan Fruits, Tea Help Fend Off Alzheimer's Disease?More Evidence Sugary Drinks Harm Women's HeartsIn COVID Crisis, Nearly Half of People in Some U.S. States Are Going HungryNavigating the Grocery Store SafelyOn Some Farms, Washing Machines Give Leafy Greens a Spin -- But Is That Safe?Coffee May Do a Heart Good, as Long as It's FilteredPotato & Sausages, Cold Cuts a Bad Combo for Your BrainTips for Safe Grocery ShoppingWhich Foods Might Reduce Your Odds for Dementia?High-Fiber Diets May Lower Odds for Breast CancerMission Possible: Tips for Safe Grocery Shopping During the PandemicDon't Worry About U.S. Food Supply, FDA SaysAHA News: Is This Nature's Healthier Meat Replacement?AHA News: If You Think Before You Snack, It's Not So BadCooking Up a Storm During Coronavirus Crisis? Store Leftovers SafelyU.S. Kids, Teens Eating Better But Nutrition Gaps PersistTurning to Tofu Might Help the Heart: StudyEating Fish in Moderation During Pregnancy Benefits Fetus: StudyDon't Abandon Healthy Eating During Coronavirus PandemicFor Heart Health, Not All Plant-Based Diets Are Equal: StudyTrying the Keto Diet? Watch Out for the 'Keto Flu'How to Understand New Food LabelsWill a Jolt of Java Get Your Creative Juices Flowing?Post-Game Snacks May Undo Calorie-Burning Benefit of Kids' SportsOlive Oil Could Help Lower Your Heart Disease RiskMore Evidence That Ditching Red Meat Is Good for Your HeartUnscrambling the Egg Data: One a Day Looks OKAHA News: How Millennials' Notions on Food Are Changing the Entire SystemWant Your Kids to Eat Veggies? Both Parents Must Set ExampleBig Breakfast May Be the Most Slimming Meal of the DaySugary Sodas Wreak Havoc With Cholesterol Levels, Harming the HeartChicago's Short-Lived 'Soda Tax' Cut Consumption, Boosted Health Care FundsMealtime Choices Could Affect Your Odds for StrokeAHA News: This Meaty Jambalaya Takes the Fat Out of Fat TuesdayMany Americans Lack Knowledge, Not Desire, to Eat Plant-Based DietsHealthy 'Mediterranean Diet' Is Good for Your MicrobiomeConsumers Waste Twice as Much Food as Experts ThoughtHow Does Social Media Shape Your Food Choices?Why Some High-Fiber Diets Cause Gas -- And What to Do About ItMeat Still Isn't Healthy, Study ConfirmsOne Egg Per Day Is Heart-Healthy, After AllAHA News: A Sweet Super Bowl Treat That Won't Sack Your HealthWant Fewer UTIs? Go Vegetarian, Study SuggestsDiets Rich in Fruits, Veggies Could Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sAHA News: Processed vs. Ultra-Processed Food, and Why It Matters to Your HealthEating Out: A Recipe for Poor Nutrition, Study Finds
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

The Scoop on Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt and Snow Cones

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jun 7th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cold, sweet ice cream cones are a favorite summertime treat -- but don't overdo it.

They're high in calories and less nutritious than you probably think. That goes for frozen yogurt and flavored snow cones too, according to Suzy Weems, a professor of family and consumer sciences at Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

Many people think ice cream is a good source of vitamin D and calcium. Not so fast, Weems said.

"It does have calcium along with vitamin D, vitamin A and some of the B vitamins to help with energy release, along with about 2.5 to 3 grams of protein -- not much, but more than none," she said in a university news release.

But at about 145 calories for a half-cup of vanilla and 160 for chocolate chip, it can break your diet -- and fast.

A half-cup of vanilla frozen yogurt has about 117 calories and a little more calcium and protein, but Weems said it's not any healthier.

As for snow cones, which are generally syrup and flavorings poured over shaved ice, Weems pointed out that each ounce of flavored syrup contains about 90 calories (4 calories for sugar-free). In other words, you're basically gobbling down sugar water.

"Sweetness doesn't quench your thirst, but few people are going to drink water after a snow cone," Weems said.

If you really crave a shaved ice treat, she suggests a pickle-juice cone. Its sourness will make you thirsty and kick-start your natural cooling system.

"The more you drink, the more you sweat," Weems said. "When sweat evaporates, you're cooler."

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers some healthy summer eating tips.