24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Chinese Scientists Cut Local Numbers of Dangerous Mosquito by 94%Health Tip: Recognizing Heat ExhaustionInsect Stings Are Just a Buzzkill for Most FolksDisinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital GermHealth Tip: Working in Extreme HeatHealth Tip: Diarrhea in KidsHow to Protect Your DNA for Big Health BenefitsNewer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More LivesHigh Blood Pressure, 'Bad' Cholesterol Risky for Young, TooSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingMany Pneumonia Patients Get Too Many AntibioticsAdopt a Diet That's Good for Your GutAHA News: 5 Threats to Heart Health You May Not Be Aware OfTongue, Lip Snip Surgeries May Be Overused in U.S. NewbornsHealth Tip: Foods With LactoseHealth Tip: Living With Celiac DiseaseMore Evidence Fried Food Ups Heart Disease, Stroke RiskBrain Injury Often a Devastating Side Effect of Domestic ViolenceNew Migraine Drug Might Help When Other Meds Don'tXpovio With Dexamethasone Approved for Refractory Multiple MyelomaPoor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's BonesIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before BirthCDC Warns of Start to 'Season' for Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in KidsShould You Try Allergen Immunotherapy?Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients HomeMore Evidence Supplements Won't Help the Heart'Semi-Slug' Is Spreading a Lethal Parasite in HawaiiAHA News: 'Surprising' Lack of Progress on Heart Disease in Younger AdultsSmall Vessel Disease Leaves Patients Vulnerable to Leg AmputationHealth Tip: Eating Out If You Have a Food AllergyHow to Create a Diet That Lowers Your CholesterolHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageSurgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm MovementIt's Mosquito Season: Here's How to Protect YourselfConcussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football PlayerOften Feel Bloated? One Ingredient May Be to BlameFor Many, Pot Is Now an Alternative to Opioids or Sleep MedsSurgery Helps Babies Missing a Heart Chamber Survive, But Problems LingerAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnCan Stem Cells Be the Cure for Baldness?Cancer Risk Rises After Iodine Rx for Overactive Thyroid: StudyGut Bacteria Supplements Might Boost Obese People's HealthEye Injuries From Fireworks in U.S. Have Nearly DoubledHealth Tip: Swallowing ProblemsMedtronic Recalls Some Insulin Pumps as FDA Warns They Could Be HackedAir Pollution Bad News for Your Blood PressureFDA Approves First Drug for Sinusitis With Nasal PolypsInfections, Especially UTIs, May Be Triggers for StrokesCould Heavier Folks Be at Lower Risk for ALS?
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Scared Safe: Pics of Sun's Damage to Face Boost Sunscreen Use

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jun 12th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is normally invisible to the naked eye.

"The UV photos, and one particular image of a mole being removed, were the most effective in terms of influencing someone to change their behavior," said study co-author Kevin John. He's an assistant professor at Brigham Young University School of Communications, in Provo, Utah.

"This tells us these are the types of images we need to use to convince people to screen themselves for cancer. Over time, we hope this will cause mortality rates to drop," John said in a university news release.

For the study, more than 2,200 adults were shown facts, stock photos of people in the sun, photos where moles have been removed, and others. In all, 60 variations were tried to find the most effective.

Skin cancer facts and figures did little to change participants' thinking about sun exposure. But John's team found that viewing a single realistic photo of mole removal led participants to say they would use sunscreen and wear protective clothing.

"Just talking about skin cancer, being inundated with facts and mortality rates, all of that is fear-inspiring language, but the images were so powerful that they moved people to intend to take action," John said.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Rates of melanoma, the deadliest skin cancer, doubled between 1982 and 2011. And non-melanoma skin cancer affects more than 3 million Americans a year, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Checking yourself for skin damage that might be cancer and then seeing your doctor can be effective in catching cancer early, when it is easier to treat.

The report was published in the June issue of the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

More information

The Skin Cancer Foundation has more about skin cancer.