24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Caring for Dementia Patient During Pandemic? Try These Stress-Busting TipsDirty Air Might Raise Your Odds for DementiaRecovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes Longer Than Expected: StudyCould Sleep Apnea Put You at Risk for Alzheimer's?Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study FindsStudy Ties Brain Inflammation to Several Types of DementiaHeart Drug Combos Might Also Lower Your Dementia Risk: StudyU.S. Primary Care Docs Unprepared for Surge in Alzheimer's CasesMaria Shriver Sounds the Alarm on Women and Alzheimer'sTraumatic Brain Injuries Raise Risk of Psychiatric Ills in SoldiersGrowing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeTwo Experimental Drugs Disappoint With Inherited Alzheimer'sGene Variant Ups Dementia Risk in Parkinson's Patients: StudyGene Variation May Protect Against Alzheimer's: StudyWhen Dementia Harms Speech, Native Language MattersEven 1 Night's Bad Sleep Can Raise Levels of a Brain 'Marker' for Alzheimer'sAHA News: Worried About Dementia? Check This Blood Pressure NumberStudy Might Point Alzheimer's Research in Whole New DirectionMore Doubt That Plaques in the Brain Cause Alzheimer'sObesity in Middle Age Could Raise Odds for Alzheimer's LaterCan Air Pollution Take a Toll on Your Memory?Animal Study Offers Hope for Treating Traumatic Brain InjuriesAlmost Half of Older Americans Fear Dementia, Try Untested Ways to Fight ItPeople Who Can't Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia RiskEducation a Buffer Against Alzheimer's Among Blacks: StudyDown Syndrome Carries Raised Risk of Dementia by 55A Gene Kept One Woman From Developing Alzheimer's -- Could It Help Others?Number of Americans With Dementia Will Double by 2040: ReportIs Head Injury Causing Dementia? MRI Might ShowBanned Trans Fats Linked to Higher Dementia Risk: StudyFamily Can Help Keep Delirium at Bay After SurgeryPro Soccer Players More Likely to Develop Dementia: StudyDrug Limits Damage of Brain InjuryYour Personality as a Teen May Predict Your Risk of DementiaWhat Helps Calm Agitated Dementia Patients?AHA News: Growing – and Aging – Hispanic Population at Risk for DementiaAHA News: Yo-Yoing Blood Pressure Could Be Bad for Those With Alzheimer'sGive Seniors a Memory Check at Annual Checkups, Experts SayFor People at High Risk, Evidence That Exercise Might Slow Alzheimer'sDementia Caregivers Often Face Sleepless NightsHealth Tip: Dementia and DrivingGetting Hitched Might Lower Your Odds for DementiaHow You Can Help Head Off Alzheimer's DiseaseDeep Brain 'Zap' Restores Vivid Memories to Alzheimer's PatientsHow to Protect a Loved One With Dementia During a Heat WaveToo Much Napping May Signal Alzheimer'sDepression, Alzheimer's Might Be Part of Same Process in Some Aging Brains: StudyStay Social to Help Cut Your Odds of DementiaBlood Test May Spot Brain Changes of Early Alzheimer'sClues to Why Women Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Education, Intelligence Might Protect Your Brain

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jun 14th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being smart and highly educated may not prevent Alzheimer's disease, but it appears to delay the disease's impact on everyday life, a new study suggests.

Researchers can't prove that that's the case, but their data suggests it might be.

"Our study was designed to look for trends, not prove cause and effect, but the major implication of our study is that exposure to education and better cognitive performance when you're younger can help preserve cognitive function for a while, even if it's unlikely to change the course of the disease," said study author Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's a professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

For the study, Gottesman and her team collected data on 331 middle-aged and older people without dementia who were followed for 20 years and had brain scans as part of a separate study. The scans revealed how much plaques were in their brains, a hallmark of Alzheimer's. The group included people with less than a high school education and those who went to college.

The researchers found that those with more education scored better on tests of memory and language than those with less education, no matter how much plaque their brains contained.

They also found that cognition scores in midlife did not affect the amounts of plaque found later in life.

"Our data suggest that more education seems to play a role as a form of cognitive reserve that helps people do better at baseline, but it doesn't affect one's actual level of decline," Gottesman said in a university news release.

The report was published in the April issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

More information

For more about Alzheimer's disease, visit the Alzheimer's Association.