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How to Move Past Life's Inevitable Speed Bumps

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jun 27th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Setbacks are a part of life for everyone, but these stumbling blocks can be extremely difficult, even debilitating, to navigate.

Taking certain steps can make it easier for you to rebound, according to experts at the University of California, Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

It's easy to get caught up going over what happened again and again in your mind. But instead of simply reliving the event, spend the time exploring your feelings surrounding it. Putting them down on paper can give you insights into the situation, help you learn from the experience and finally move forward.

Rather than berate yourself for whatever role you played in what happened, show yourself the same compassion you show friends and loved ones when you see them struggling with a serious issue. Be kind to yourself -- this can change your mindset from blame to being open to finding better solutions in the future.

If the situation was brought on by the actions of another person (or more than one), forgiveness may help you move forward. That doesn't necessarily mean you must reconcile with the offenders -- it's possible that their actions are inexcusable and you can't go back to the relationship you had before. But forgiving them will stop you from wasting your valuable energy on holding a grudge and, again, allow you to go forward and not be trapped by the past.

Rather than dwelling on negative feelings or burying them, these approaches can help restore a sense of control and give you back the confidence you need to move ahead. It's not always easy to be resilient, but for your own well-being, it's worth making the effort.

More information

The University of California, Berkeley has more strategies to build resilience on the Greater Good website.