24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Sleep Problems in Early Childhood Linked to Teens' Mental Health IssuesPot Use in Pregnancy Could Mean Sleepless KidsWith Social Distancing, Schools Should Be Safe to Reopen This Fall, Experts SayThe Long-Term Harm of Missing SchoolHow the Pandemic Is Changing Summer CampHealthier School Meal Programs Helped Poorer Kids Beat Obesity: StudyWith Pandemic-Related Stress, Abuse Against Kids Can SurgeKeep Your Kids Safe in the Water. Here's HowMultiple Surgeries for Cleft Lip, Palate Won't Cause Major Psychological Damage2 in 3 Parents Would Send Kids to School in Fall: SurveySigns of Developing Adult Diabetes Seen as Early as Age 8: StudyVaccine Might Guard Against Bacteria That Cause Diarrhea in KidsShould You Send Your Kid to Summer Camp? Expert Offers AdvicePractice Gun Safety for Your Kids' Sake, Especially During PandemicAsthma More Likely in Kids With Disabilities, DelaysDon't Let COVID-19 Scuttle Your Child's Health ExamsAbout 1 in 15 Parents 'Hesitant' About Child Vaccines: SurveyHome Alone: Will Pandemic's Changes Harm Kids' Mental Health Long-Term?Concussion Can Lead to Vision, Balance Problems in Young KidsAHA News: Finding Balance Between the Good of Youth Sports and Risks of COVID-19Black Children Hit Especially Hard by COVID-19 Inflammatory SyndromeKids Breaking Fewer Bones During Pandemic, But More Fractures Happening at HomeSimilar to Adults, Obesity Raises Kids' Odds for Severe COVID-19Are Food Allergies Under-Diagnosed in Poor Families?Stay-at-Home Orders Could Mean More Obese Kids: StudyWhere Are Kids Getting the Most 'Empty Calories'?AHA News: For Kids, a Pandemic of Stress Could Have Long-Term Consequences6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine MeltdownsFor Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn't Just a Phase, Study FindsSure-Fire Solutions for Managing Lockdown Temper TantrumsKeeping Kids Slim, Fit During Lockdown Isn't Easy: Here Are Some TipsCOVID-19 Antibodies May Tame Inflammatory Condition in Kids: StudyCould Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?Italian Doctors Detail Cases of Inflammatory Condition in Kids With COVID-19AHA News: Is Your Child's Blood Pressure Something to Worry About?Zika Virus Tied to Profound Developmental DelaysCOVID-19 Still Rare in Kids, But Far From Harmless: StudyKids' ER Visits for Mental Health Problems Soared Over 10 YearsTo Prevent Injuries, Give Your Kids a Pass on Cutting the GrassFewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad ThingLoving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in KidsBest Ways to Help Kids Through the PandemicIn Rare Cases, COVID-19 May Be Causing Severe Heart Condition in KidsReplace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From ToxinsCoronavirus Crisis Has Fewer Kids Getting Needed VaccinesAHA News: Traumatic Childhood Increases Lifelong Risk for Heart Disease, Early DeathFDA Bans Products That Help Kids Hide Vape Use From ParentsCalm Parenting Will Help Children Through Coronavirus PandemicStudy Confirms Safety, Effectiveness of Children's VaccinesUp to 50,000 U.S. Kids May Be Hospitalized With COVID-19 by Year's End
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

A Prescription for Medicating Your Child Safely

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Sep 2nd 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Sept. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When your child is sick, taking the right medication can make all the difference -- as long as it's correctly chosen and measured. But sometimes mistakes occur. Here are safety steps to help prevent medication errors from happening.

Make sure that the prescribing doctor knows about any drugs, vitamins and supplements your child takes, and about any allergies he or she might have. Confirm your child's weight so the right dose is prescribed.

Verify with the doctor how many times a day, at what intervals and for how many days your child needs the medicine. Ask if your child's diet or activities need to be changed while on the medication. Find out how soon you should see results. Write down all of this information along with the exact spelling of the drug name. According to a Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences study, 88% of medication errors involve the wrong drug or the wrong dose.

When you fill the prescription, double-check that the drug name, dose and frequency on the label is what your doctor ordered. Go over the directions with your pharmacist. If a liquid medicine doesn't come with its own dosing device, buy one, or be sure to use the right size measuring spoon -- not a kitchen spoon.

The medication should come with a printout called "patient prescribing information," which will detail side effects and cautions. Ask for it if it's not offered and review it at home. If your child experiences any side effects, call your doctor right away.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on how to safely give children medications.