24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
FDA Approves First Oral Drug for Spinal Muscular AtrophyCOVID-19 Fears Stop Americans From Seeking Help for Heart EmergenciesAHA News: What Do Heart Patients Need to Know About COVID-19 Now?Have Diabetes? Don't Lose Sight of Danger to Your EyesBlood Test Might Spot Most Dangerous COVID-19 CasesAs Schools Reopen, Report Shows 97,000 U.S. Kids Infected With COVID in Late JulyWhat Parents Need to Know About Teens and ConcussionsBaby's Meningitis Case Highlights Growing Danger of Antibiotic ResistanceAs in Adults, Minority Kids Hit Hardest by COVID-19Simple Test Shows Which Face Masks Are BestBeware of Hand Sanitizers Containing MethanolWhat Athletes Should Know About COVID-19, Heart Damage and Working OutCOVID-19 Causing More Stress in America Than Other Nations: SurveyWill Your Kid Play School Sports This Fall? Here's Some Guidance on Doing It SafelyScientists Call for Broader Use of Faster COVID TestsTwo Common Nutrients Might Keep Vertigo at BayPeople Are Dying, Going Blind After Drinking Hand Sanitizer, CDC WarnsMore Social Media Use, More Fake COVID NewsSkip the 'Maskne,' Not the MaskObesity Ups Odds for Severe COVID-19, But Age MattersSeven States Join Pact to Speed Coronavirus TestingStudy Casts Doubt on Value of Cholesterol DrugsCOVID-19 Fears Had Sick, Injured Americans Avoiding ERsCancer Diagnoses Plunge as Americans Avoid Screening During PandemicMysterious Paralyzing Illness in Kids Is Set to Return, CDC WarnsMany Older Americans Staying Strong in the PandemicCoronavirus Cases Now Climbing in the MidwestCould the First Drug That Slows Arthritis Be Here?Schools Can Reopen Safely If Precautions in Place, Australian Study ShowsFace Masks, Yes, But Don't Forget Hand-Washing TooEven With PPE, Risk of COVID-19 Still High for Frontline WorkersCoronavirus Pandemic Becoming Far More Widespread, Birx SaysGuard Against Lyme Disease This SummerKids 'Efficient' Transmitters as COVID-19 Raced Through a Georgia Summer CampCollege Students Will Need COVID Tests Every 2-3 Days for Campus Safety: StudyAHA News: Sustained High Blood Pressure May Damage Brain VesselsAnother Side Effect of COVID-19 -- Lasting Hearing Problems?Pandemic Could Complicate Hurricane SeasonStudy Reveals How Coronavirus Travels IndoorsNew Study Sheds Doubt on Notion Kids Aren't COVID-19 SpreadersAHA News: Are Virtual Doctor Visits Safe for Discharged Heart Failure Patients?Double Lung Transplants Save Lives of Sickest COVID PatientsGynecological Cancers Not a Risk for Severe COVID-19: Study11 States Could Face ICU Doc Shortages as Coronavirus Cases SurgeWildfire Pollution Puts Kidney Patients at RiskAmerica's Progress Against Early Cardiovascular Death Is SlowingAHA News: 5 Easy Ways to Keep Tabs on Heart HealthGene Study Shows How Coronavirus Swept Through the Diamond PrincessOne Disease Mosquitoes Don't Spread: CoronavirusU.S. Coronavirus Death Toll Surges Past 150,000
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Some People Vaccinated Against Mumps May Not Be Protected: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 6th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are gaps in immunity against mumps among college-aged Americans who were vaccinated in childhood, researchers say.

New findings show the need to learn more about the immune system response to mumps and mumps vaccination.

Mumps is a highly contagious viral disease that can spread rapidly among people in close living quarters, such as college students and sports teams. In the last 15 years, several outbreaks have occurred across the United States. Outbreaks have recently been reported in U.S. migrant detention facilities.

"Overall, the MMR [measles, mumps, rubella] vaccine has been great, with a 99% reduction in measles, mumps and rubella disease, and a significant reduction in associated complications since its introduction," said Dr. Sri Edupuganti. She is an associate professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine, in Atlanta.

"What we're seeing now with these mumps outbreaks is a combination of two things -- a few people were not making a strong immune response to begin with, and the circulating strain has drifted away from the strain that is in the vaccine," she explained in a university news release.

The study, by researchers at Emory and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), included 71 people, aged 18 to 23, in the Atlanta area. Nearly all (69) had received two MMR doses, but 80% received their second dose more than a decade before the study began.

While 93% had antibodies against mumps, 10% had no detectable anti-mumps memory B cells. These cells produce antibodies after exposure to the mumps virus.

On average, the frequency of memory B cells in participants' blood was five to 10 times lower for cells making antibodies against mumps than for cells making antibodies to measles or rubella, the investigators found.

The researchers also found that the participants' antibodies were not as effective against the type of mumps virus circulating in the wild as against the strain targeted by MMR.

At least six participants may have been susceptible to infection with the currently circulating strain, according to the report published Sept. 2 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

There was no clear link between the timing of MMR vaccination and low antibody or memory B cell levels, the study authors said.

In 2017, the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices approved a third dose of MMR vaccine for people exposed to mumps during outbreaks.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on mumps.