24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Health Tip: The Importance of HydrationHealthy Lifestyle, Regular Screening May Keep Cancer at BayBPA Levels in Humans Are Underestimated: StudyHow Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might TellDistracted by Their Smartphones, Pedestrians Are Landing in the ERAntarctic Study Shows Isolation, Monotony May Change the Human BrainAre E-Scooters a Quick Ticket to the ER?Sleep Deprivation a Big Drain on the BrainLife Expectancy Shrinks for America's Working-Age AdultsHitting the Highway This Holiday Season? Buckle Up in Front and BackAHA News: Regular Fasting Could Lead to Longer, Healthier LifeHealth Tip: Avoiding Cabin Fever This WinterKeep Stress Under Control as Holiday Season StartsThree Tips for Getting Your Zzzzzz'sHealth Tip: Creating a Healthy RoutineDon't Let Salmonella Make Your Thanksgiving a TurkeyMusic Integral to All Cultures, in Similar Ways: StudyAHA News: Eating Mindfully Through the Holidays – and All YearProtect Yourself From Frigid-Weather EmergenciesNot Getting Enough Shut-Eye? You Have Plenty of Company'Meatless Monday' Can Help Change Diets for GoodPlants Will Not Boost Your Home's Air Quality: StudyHealth Tip: Ridesharing SafetyHealth Tip: Autumn Driving SafetyTV Binges, Video Games, Books and Sports Taking Toll on SleepSurvey Shows Americans Feel StressedDon't Get Along With Family? Check Your HealthHow to Head Off Holiday Weight GainClimate Change a 'Threat to Human Well-Being,' Scientists SayHealth Tip: Bundle Up on Cold, Windy DaysGet Healthier With a Mental ResetAre You Lonely? Your Tweets Offer Important Clues, Experts SayDaylight Saving Time Bad for Health, Experts ClaimMore Reasons Why You Must Manage Your StressWith Time Change, Use That Extra Hour for SleepAHA News: Your Neighborhood's Walkability May Be A Trick-Or-Treat For Your Heart All YearToo Little Time to Exercise? Survey Suggests OtherwiseAlmost Half of Americans Have Been Sleepy Behind the WheelHealth Tip: The 'Wall Test' For Good PostureCould Screens' Blue Light Make You Old Before Your Time?Health Tip: Prioritizing Your WellnessThe Wellness Boost of a Purposeful LifeHealth Tip: Planning a Stress-Reducing VacationWhy Maintaining a Healthy Weight Is Important in AdulthoodAHA News: The Road to Better Exercise Might Be in Your PlaylistAre You Eating More Calories Than You Think?How Fast You Walk Might Show How Fast You're AgingTying the Knot Is Tied to Longer Life Span, New Data ShowsCould Eating Healthier Be a Natural Antidepressant?'Smartphone Slouching' More Serious Than It Sounds
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

How to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent Fractures

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 12th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a young adult, start thinking about your bone health, an expert advises.

Most people reach peak bone mass -- the strongest bones they'll ever have -- between 25 and 30 years of age, according to Dr. Philip Bosha, a physician with Penn State Sports Medicine in State College, Pa.

"To some extent, genetics determines the peak, but lifestyle influences, such as diet and exercise, are also factors," Bosha said in a Penn State news release.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, bone mass starts to slowly decrease after age 40. Taking 1,000 milligrams of calcium and 1,000 International Units (IU) of vitamin D a day can help maintain your bones. You should also do weight-bearing exercises such as running and brisk walking, as well as resistance training to maintain bone and muscle strength.

After age 50, the daily recommended calcium intake for men remains 1,000 milligrams per day, but rises to 1,200 milligrams for women, including those who are entering or have gone through menopause.

Declining estrogen levels due to menopause can lead to rapid bone loss. All women 65 and older -- and those between 60 and 64 who have an increased risk of fractures -- should get a bone density study, according to Bosha.

"If the bone density study shows osteoporosis, it may be reasonable to start taking a medication called a bisphosphonate, which you can get in a variety of forms," he said. "Some are pills taken on a weekly or monthly basis and other varieties can be taken intravenously."

Other medications to improve bone density include calcitonin, which can be used as a nasal spray; parathyroid hormone, which is taken by injection; and medications called selective estrogen receptor modulators.

Bosha said men and women who are 70 and older should take 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day and 800 IU of vitamin D. At this age, men become far more likely to have lower bone density, increasing their risk of fractures. Some men should consider a bone density study, Bosha said.

"For people of this age, avoiding falls is crucial," he said. "Maintaining balance and muscle strength through exercise and maintaining strong bones through adequate calcium and vitamin D intake can help decrease the risk of severe fractures from falls."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on bone health.