24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
AHA News: Why Stay in Touch While Keeping Distant? It's Only HumanWorking Off Your Quarantine Weight GainAs REM Sleep Declines, Life Span SuffersFollow Exercise Guidelines and You'll Live Longer, Study SaysBiases Mean Men Dubbed 'Brilliant' More Often Than WomenFireworks Are Bad News for Your LungsPandemic Means More Backyard Fireworks This Year -- And More DangerA Safer 4th Is One Without Backyard FireworksSleeping In on Weekends Won't Erase Your 'Sleep Debt'As Pandemic Leads to Clearer Skies, Solar Energy Output RisesWhen Can Sports Fans Safely Fill Stadiums Again?AHA News: How to Stay Safe, Healthy and Cool This Summer Despite COVID-19 ThreatWhat Behaviors Will Shorten Your Life?Heat Kills More Americans Than Previously ThoughtYes, Bad Sleep Does Make People GrumpyDespite Predictions, Loneliness Not Rising for Americans Under LockdownDon't Be a 'Hot-Head': Study Suggests Head Overheating Impairs ThinkingWhy Exercise? Researchers Say It Prevents 3.9 Million Deaths a YearWorking From Home? Posture, Ergonomics Can Make It SafeWant to Travel During the Pandemic? Here's What to ConsiderHealthier Meals Could Mean Fewer Strokes, Heart AttacksWhat Difference Do Calorie Counts on Menus Make?Want Added Years? Try VolunteeringEating Before Bedtime Might Pack on the PoundsWhy Are Some People More Sensitive Than Others? Genes May TellWalking or Biking to Work Might Save Your LifeAmid Pandemic, Protest Peacefully While Staying HealthyHow to Get Better Sleep While Working at HomeIn a Pandemic-Stressed America, Protests Add to Mental StrainHealth Warning Labels Could Cut Soda SalesProtect Yourself From Sun to Prevent Skin CancerAs a Nation's Worth Grows, So Do WaistlinesBike-Sharing Gets Commuters Out of Cars: StudyBanishing Pandemic Worries for a Good Night's SleepAs Summer Starts, Sun Safety Slashes Skin Cancer RiskDuring the Pandemic, How Safe Is the Great American Summer Vacation?AHA News: A Silver Lining for Foster, Adopted Pets – and Their People – During Coronavirus PandemicEven One High-Fat Meal May Dull Your MindDon't Let the Coronavirus Pandemic Rob You of Your SleepMore Trees, Parks May Mean Longer Lives for City DwellersReckless Driving on the Rise During COVID-19 PandemicTips to Keeping Slim When You're Stuck at HomeMoney Not a Good Measure of Your Self-WorthWhich Foods Might Reduce Your Odds for Dementia?Ride-Sharing Services Tied to Rise in Car CrashesAmericans Got the Memo on Social Distancing, Poll ShowsA Consistent Bedtime Is Good for Your HeartAHA News: Eat Healthy, Move Your Body During Pandemic'Stress Eating' While Social Distancing? Here's Tips to Avoid ItStaying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay Connected
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

How to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent Fractures

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 12th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a young adult, start thinking about your bone health, an expert advises.

Most people reach peak bone mass -- the strongest bones they'll ever have -- between 25 and 30 years of age, according to Dr. Philip Bosha, a physician with Penn State Sports Medicine in State College, Pa.

"To some extent, genetics determines the peak, but lifestyle influences, such as diet and exercise, are also factors," Bosha said in a Penn State news release.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, bone mass starts to slowly decrease after age 40. Taking 1,000 milligrams of calcium and 1,000 International Units (IU) of vitamin D a day can help maintain your bones. You should also do weight-bearing exercises such as running and brisk walking, as well as resistance training to maintain bone and muscle strength.

After age 50, the daily recommended calcium intake for men remains 1,000 milligrams per day, but rises to 1,200 milligrams for women, including those who are entering or have gone through menopause.

Declining estrogen levels due to menopause can lead to rapid bone loss. All women 65 and older -- and those between 60 and 64 who have an increased risk of fractures -- should get a bone density study, according to Bosha.

"If the bone density study shows osteoporosis, it may be reasonable to start taking a medication called a bisphosphonate, which you can get in a variety of forms," he said. "Some are pills taken on a weekly or monthly basis and other varieties can be taken intravenously."

Other medications to improve bone density include calcitonin, which can be used as a nasal spray; parathyroid hormone, which is taken by injection; and medications called selective estrogen receptor modulators.

Bosha said men and women who are 70 and older should take 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day and 800 IU of vitamin D. At this age, men become far more likely to have lower bone density, increasing their risk of fractures. Some men should consider a bone density study, Bosha said.

"For people of this age, avoiding falls is crucial," he said. "Maintaining balance and muscle strength through exercise and maintaining strong bones through adequate calcium and vitamin D intake can help decrease the risk of severe fractures from falls."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on bone health.