24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction to Disorders of ChildhoodIntellectual DisabilitiesMotor Skills DisordersLearning DisordersCommunication DisordersAutism and Pervasive Developmental DisordersADHD and Disruptive Behavior DisordersFeeding and Elimination DisordersAnxiety DisordersReactive Attachment DisorderStereotypic Movement DisorderTic DisordersInfancy, Childhood or Adolescence, Not Otherwise Specified
Latest News
Too Little Sleep Takes Toll on Kids' Mental Health: StudyAmerican Teens Struggling With Mental Health IssuesSleepless Babies May Face Emotional Troubles as KidsTeen Moms at High Risk for Depression, AnxietyGetting Quality Autism Therapy From Thousands of Miles AwayGirls With Autism Diagnosed Later Than BoysCould a Common Diuretic Med Help Ease Autism Symptoms?Largest-Ever Study Ties Over 100 Genes to AutismBrain Waves Offer Insight Into Autism-Linked Sleep StrugglesFamily Therapy Best for Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder1 in 4 Children With Autism Is Undiagnosed: StudyCould Brain Scans Spot Children's Mood, Attention Problems Early?Updated Autism Guidelines Stress Earliest Screenings PossibleBullying's 'Vicious Circle' Harms Mental HealthCould Fish Oil Be an ADHD Remedy for Some Kids?Most Parents Struggle to Spot Depression in TeensAcetaminophen in Pregnancy Might Raise Children's Odds of ADHD, AutismNew Finding Challenges Old Notions About DyslexiaRaising a Child With ADHD Can Test a ParentFor Kids With Asthma, Depression Makes ER Visit More LikelyPediatric Group Issues Updated ADHD GuidelinesU.S. Autism Rates Rising Fastest for Hispanics, BlacksBack-to-School Tips for Kids on the Autism SpectrumHealth Tip: Mental Illness Warning SignsScientists Uncover More Autism GenesADHD Meds May Alter Boys' BrainsUnlocking Speech for Kids With AutismADHD Meds Help Keep Kids Out of TroubleAutism Largely Caused by Genetics, Not Environment: StudyShame Around Mental Illness May Be Fading, Survey ShowsDevelopmental Tests Might Spot Autism at Even Younger AgesTreatments Targeting Social Behavior Hormone Show Promise With Autism'Microbiome' May Be Key to Autism SymptomsAutism Diagnoses Reliable at 14 Months, Study FindsDoes Diet Affect a Child's ADHD?Guideline Changes Have Asperger's Community on EdgeHarmless Brain Abnormalities in Kids Pose Disclosure Dilemmas
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

For Kids With Asthma, Depression Makes ER Visit More Likely

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Sep 30th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that anxiety and depression can make it hard for some kids to manage their asthma.

Young patients with all three conditions ended up in the emergency room nearly twice as often as kids who only struggle with asthma, the study found.

"Asthma self-management is complex, requiring recognition of symptoms, adherence to medication and avoidance of triggers," explained study first author Dr. Naomi Bardach. She is from the University of California, San Francisco's department of pediatrics and Institute for Health Policy Studies.

"The symptoms of anxiety and depression can make it more challenging to follow treatment, leading to more ER visits," she added in a university news release. "There also may be a greater tendency to use the ER for supportive services, even in the absence of a serious asthma attack."

Though many of these emergency department visits are not necessary, they account for 62% of asthma-related costs, the investigators found.

Anxiety and depression are more common in children with asthma than in those without the lung disease, the researchers noted. Among the asthma patients in the study, just over 11% had anxiety and nearly 6% had depression. This compared with about 7% and 3%, respectively, for children aged 3 to 17 in the general population, based on data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For the study, the researchers collected data on more than 65,000 patients with asthma, aged 6 to 21. The findings showed that nearly 8% also had both depression and anxiety. These patients had almost twice the rate of emergency department visits as those without depression and anxiety.

Children with all three disorders may need more intensive care to help them stick with their medication and mental health care for their anxiety and depression, Bardach suggested.

"The study highlights a population of children and youth who may benefit from more intensive care coordination," she said. "This may mean more careful counseling to improve medication compliance and symptom recognition. It may also mean improved mental health care for children in whom untreated depression or anxiety may hinder asthma self-management."

The report was published online Sept. 25 in the journal Pediatrics.

More information

For more on asthma, head to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.