24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction to Disorders of ChildhoodIntellectual DisabilitiesMotor Skills DisordersLearning DisordersCommunication DisordersAutism and Pervasive Developmental DisordersADHD and Disruptive Behavior DisordersFeeding and Elimination DisordersAnxiety DisordersReactive Attachment DisorderStereotypic Movement DisorderTic DisordersInfancy, Childhood or Adolescence, Not Otherwise Specified
Latest News
Sleep Problems in Early Childhood Linked to Teens' Mental Health IssuesFDA Approves 'Prescription Video Game' for Kids With ADHDPandemic Causing Havoc for Kids With ADHDHome Alone: Will Pandemic's Changes Harm Kids' Mental Health Long-Term?Pandemic Can Overwhelm Those With AutismUncles, Aunts May Influence a Child's Odds for AutismCould Umbilical Cord Blood Help Ease Autism?Watch Out for Your Teen's Mental HealthSudden Obsessions, Tantrums: What Is PANS in Kids?Screen Time for Tiniest Tots Linked to Autism-Like SymptomsToo Little Sleep Takes Toll on Kids' Mental Health: StudyAmerican Teens Struggling With Mental Health IssuesSleepless Babies May Face Emotional Troubles as KidsTeen Moms at High Risk for Depression, AnxietyGetting Quality Autism Therapy From Thousands of Miles AwayGirls With Autism Diagnosed Later Than BoysCould a Common Diuretic Med Help Ease Autism Symptoms?Largest-Ever Study Ties Over 100 Genes to AutismBrain Waves Offer Insight Into Autism-Linked Sleep StrugglesFamily Therapy Best for Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder1 in 4 Children With Autism Is Undiagnosed: StudyCould Brain Scans Spot Children's Mood, Attention Problems Early?Updated Autism Guidelines Stress Earliest Screenings PossibleBullying's 'Vicious Circle' Harms Mental HealthCould Fish Oil Be an ADHD Remedy for Some Kids?Most Parents Struggle to Spot Depression in TeensAcetaminophen in Pregnancy Might Raise Children's Odds of ADHD, AutismNew Finding Challenges Old Notions About DyslexiaRaising a Child With ADHD Can Test a ParentFor Kids With Asthma, Depression Makes ER Visit More LikelyPediatric Group Issues Updated ADHD GuidelinesU.S. Autism Rates Rising Fastest for Hispanics, BlacksBack-to-School Tips for Kids on the Autism SpectrumHealth Tip: Mental Illness Warning SignsADHD Meds May Alter Boys' BrainsGuideline Changes Have Asperger's Community on EdgeHarmless Brain Abnormalities in Kids Pose Disclosure Dilemmas
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Raising a Child With ADHD Can Test a Parent

HealthDay News
by -- Alan Mozes
Updated: May 19th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Raising a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can often be overwhelming, but one expert offers tips on how to keep stress levels down so you can stay connected to your child.

Dara Babinski, a child psychologist with Penn State Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., has spent considerable time delving into the issue.

The first thing to know, she said, is that ADHD can manifest in many different ways. In some cases the disorder -- which is usually diagnosed during childhood -- can center around a child having difficulty focusing or completing tasks.

For others, the main issues may have more to do with impulsive behavior, such as incessantly moving around or talking excessively. Some children suffer from both concerns.

But "there often seems to be a negative impact for many parents, no matter what types of symptoms the child displays," Babinski said in a medical center news release.

And that's a problem, she added, because "parental involvement is really critical" when it comes to caring for a child with ADHD. "[So] when the parent-child relationship is strained, that is a risk factor for long-term difficulties for the child."

It can take a lot to manage the behavior of a child with ADHD, which can require energy, Babinski noted. There's also concern over learning and disciplinary problems at school. And parents typically end up trapped in a merry-go-round of visits to pediatricians, psychiatrists and behavioral therapists, which can often mean missing work.

All these factors can end up consuming a parent's time and drive up parental stress, she said.

But despite the stress, Babinski emphasized how critical it is that parents remain attentive to their child's needs, even as he or she ages out of adolescence into young adulthood.

So what can parents do to stay involved while keeping a lid on stress? Babinski advises parents to work in concert with teachers, so that together they can come up with an organized plan to help the child overcome whatever hurdles ADHD throws in his or her path.

She also points out that it's not uncommon for parents of children with ADHD to struggle with depression or other mental health concerns. Roughly a quarter to half of such parents have such issues, she said.

And if that's the case, parents should make sure to get the treatment they need, Babinski said.

"That can also help the child's behavior if the parent is feeling better and has more time and energy to focus on handling the child's behaviors," she explained.

More information

There's more about ADHD for parents at KidsHealth.