24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Education a Buffer Against Alzheimer's Among Blacks: StudyDown Syndrome Carries Raised Risk of Dementia by 55A Gene Kept One Woman From Developing Alzheimer's -- Could It Help Others?Number of Americans With Dementia Will Double by 2040: ReportIs Head Injury Causing Dementia? MRI Might ShowBanned Trans Fats Linked to Higher Dementia Risk: StudyFamily Can Help Keep Delirium at Bay After SurgeryPro Soccer Players More Likely to Develop Dementia: StudyDrug Limits Damage of Brain InjuryYour Personality as a Teen May Predict Your Risk of DementiaWhat Helps Calm Agitated Dementia Patients?AHA News: Growing – and Aging – Hispanic Population at Risk for DementiaAHA News: Yo-Yoing Blood Pressure Could Be Bad for Those With Alzheimer'sGive Seniors a Memory Check at Annual Checkups, Experts SayFor People at High Risk, Evidence That Exercise Might Slow Alzheimer'sDementia Caregivers Often Face Sleepless NightsHealth Tip: Dementia and DrivingGetting Hitched Might Lower Your Odds for DementiaHow You Can Help Head Off Alzheimer's DiseaseDeep Brain 'Zap' Restores Vivid Memories to Alzheimer's PatientsHow to Protect a Loved One With Dementia During a Heat WaveToo Much Napping May Signal Alzheimer'sDepression, Alzheimer's Might Be Part of Same Process in Some Aging Brains: StudyStay Social to Help Cut Your Odds of DementiaBlood Test May Spot Brain Changes of Early Alzheimer'sClues to Why Women Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer'sA New and Better Way to 'Stage' Alzheimer's Patients?At Risk for Alzheimer's? Exercise Might Help Keep It at BayHealthy Living Can Cut Odds for Alzheimer's in People at Genetic RiskHormone Treatment for Prostate Cancer Linked to Heightened Alzheimer's RiskAlzheimer's Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20sWidely Prescribed Class of Meds Might Raise Dementia RiskCancer Survivors May Have Lower Odds for DementiaCommon Blood Pressure Med Might Help Fight Alzheimer'sEducation, Intelligence Might Protect Your BrainOpioids Put Alzheimer's Patients at Risk of Pneumonia: StudyFor Some, Trouble Tracking Finances Could Be Sign of DementiaIt's Never Too Late for New Brain CellsHigh LDL Cholesterol Tied to Early-Onset Alzheimer'sDoes Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Raise Dementia Risk?Could Alzheimer's Spread Like Infection Throughout the Brain?Newly Discovered Illness May Cause Nearly 1 in 5 Dementias, Experts SayFinancial Scammers Often Prey on People With Early DementiaMore Alzheimer's Drug Trial Failures: Are Researchers on the Wrong Track?Gum Disease Shows Possible Links to Alzheimer'sBrain Scans Spot, Track Alzheimer'sFewer Periods May Mean Higher Dementia RiskOnly Spoken Words Processed in Newly Discovered Brain RegionRate of U.S. Deaths Tied to Dementia Has More Than DoubledEven Distant Relatives' History Could Up Your Alzheimer's Risk
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Pro Soccer Players More Likely to Develop Dementia: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Oct 21st 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former professional soccer players have a significantly increased risk of death from brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, a new study finds.

Former soccer players were about 3.5 times more likely to die of neurodegenerative diseases than people in the general population, according to a study in Scotland.

"This analysis revealed that risk ranged from a fivefold increase in Alzheimer's disease, through an approximately fourfold increase in motor neuron disease, to a twofold in Parkinson's disease in former professional [soccer players] compared to population controls," said study leader Dr. Willie Stewart.

Stewart is a consultant neuropathologist and honorary clinical associate professor at the University of Glasgow.

Prior studies of contact sports athletes, particularly National Football League (NFL) players in the United States, have tied repeated head blows to another degenerative brain disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Deceased Hall of Famers Frank Gifford and Junior Seau were among the NFL players who developed CTE.

In one study at Boston University, risk of CTE was linked to length of time playing tackle football.

"While we don't yet know absolute risk of developing CTE among football players, this study found that the risk of developing CTE increased by 30% per year played," said Dr. Ann McKee, director of Boston University's CTE Center.

According to the center, CTE symptoms -- including mood and memory problems -- generally begin appearing years after the onset of head impacts.

In the current study, Stewart's team analyzed the causes of death among nearly 7,700 former Scottish male professional soccer players and more than 23,000 people in the general population born between 1900 and 1976.

While former soccer players were more likely to die from neurodegenerative disease, they were less likely to die of other common diseases, such as heart disease and some cancers, including lung cancer.

Deaths among former soccer players were lower than expected up to age 70, and higher than expected over that age, according to the study. The results were published Oct. 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

"Our data show that while former [soccer players] had higher dementia rates, they had lower rates of death due to other major diseases. As such, whilst every effort must be made to identify the factors contributing to the increased risk of neurodegenerative disease to allow this risk to be reduced, there are also wider potential health benefits of playing [soccer] to be considered," Stewart said in a university news release.

The study was funded by the Football Association and the Professional Footballers' Association. (In Europe, soccer is called football.)

"The whole game must recognize that this is only the start of our understanding and there are many questions that still need to be answered," said Greg Clarke, Football Association chairman. "It is important that the global [soccer] family now unites to find the answers."

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on neurodegenerative diseases.