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Try These Homemade Chocolate Treats for Halloween

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Oct 25th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Oct. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- This Halloween, don't deny yourself tempting treats or throw your healthy eating plan out of whack when the kids indulge. The answer is chocolate-covered fruit -- all the sweetness of candy with nutrients you won't find in the Trick or Treat bag.

Fresh berries and fruit wedges, like apples and pears, are super high in healing antioxidants, and dipping them in dark chocolate means an extra boost for your brain with its mood-elevating compounds.

Fancy chocolate-covered fruit from gourmet food companies can be expensive, but making your own is not only budget-friendly, but also a lot easier than you might think.

Chocolate-Dipped Fruit

  • 7 ounces dark chocolate with at least 70% cacao
  • 8 ounces large strawberries
  • 2 apples or pears, cut into wedges

Line an oversized plate or cookie sheet with wax paper.

Fill the bottom pot of a double boiler halfway with water, place over medium heat and bring to a simmer. (If you don't have a double boiler, use a medium saucepan and a heat-resistant glass bowl that will fit inside.) Chop chocolate into small pieces and place in the top of the double boiler. Melt for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring often, until the chocolate is smooth. Turn off the heat.

Use a fork to dip each berry and fruit slice into the chocolate. Then place on the wax paper-lined plate or cookie sheet. Chill briefly until the chocolate hardens. Gently peel each piece of fruit off the paper and arrange on a serving dish.

Yield: 6 servings

More information

The Food Revolution Network has more on antioxidants and top food sources.