24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
More Than 100 E. Coli Illnesses Now Linked to Romaine LettuceAHA News: Vegan Diet May Decrease Heart Disease, Stroke Risk in African AmericansHealth Tip: Five Exercise and Nutrition MythsMore E. coli Illnesses Linked to Tainted Romaine LettucePlay It Safe With Holiday FoodsAHA News: Sweet Potatoes Are a Holiday Dish to Be Thankful ForAHA News: Regular Fasting Could Lead to Longer, Healthier LifeDon't Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif., Due to E. Coli: FDADon't Let Salmonella Make Your Thanksgiving a TurkeyPackaged Caesar Salad Suspected as Possible Source in E. coli OutbreakMore U.S. Kids Are Shunning Sweetened DrinksHealth Tip: Thanksgiving and Your Heart HealthHealth Tip: Eat for Now, and the FutureHealth Tip: How to Safely Roast a Turkey'Meatless Monday' Can Help Change Diets for GoodExperimental Injection May Protect Against Peanut AllergyUltra-Processed Foods May Fast Track You to Heart TroubleA Tasty and Nutritious Way to Prepare FishThe Healthiest Condiment You've Never Heard OfHow to Make a Lighter Layer CakeAHA News: Your Eating-On-The-Job Problems, SolvedOne Dead, 8 Hospitalized in Salmonella Outbreak Tied to Ground BeefWhen You Eat May Matter More Than What You Eat: StudyMake a Plan for Gardening Next Spring With Your KidsTry This Easy Pumpkin Dessert for HalloweenConsumers' Orders Changed Slightly After Calorie Counts Added to MenusTry This Healthy Autumn Apple DessertFast-Food Outlet in Neighborhood Could Mean Heavier Kids: StudyBan on Sale of Sugary Drinks Trimmed Employees' WaistlinesA Lighter, Healthier Version of Baked Crab DipGiving Up One Food Will Help Your Health -- and the PlanetToo Much Salt Might Make You Gain WeightPediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial SweetenersCould More Coffee Bring a Healthier Microbiome?Health Tip: Living With Nut AllergyTry These Homemade Chocolate Treats for HalloweenMore TV, Smartphone Time Means More Sugary Drinks for TeensBanned Trans Fats Linked to Higher Dementia Risk: StudyDon't Be Fooled By Foods That Sound Healthy But Aren'tHealth Tip: Understanding Omega-3 Fatty AcidsMaking a Lighter Chicken ParmesanHow to Get the Fruit and Veggies You Need Without Busting the BudgetCooking With GreensHow to Make Your Own Healthy Chicken TendersMillet: A Whole Grain You Might Be OverlookingNone of Top-Selling Kids' Drinks Meet Experts' Health RecommendationsPut Safety First When Planning to Pack Food-to-GoHow to Spice Up Everyday OatmealWhat Foods Are Most Likely to Cause Acne Breakouts?Farm-to-Table Movement Goes to School
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

'Meatless Monday' Can Help Change Diets for Good

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 14th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people who tried going meatless one day a week to call attention to food and climate change continued after the campaign ended, a new study says.

Researchers surveyed 320 households from Bedford, N.Y., that took part in the town's "Meatless Monday" campaign in 2018. For 12 weeks, participants ate no meat one day a week.

In a survey six months later, nearly 57% of respondents said they were eating less meat than before the campaign, and more than 70% said they skip meat every Monday or at least once a week.

Nearly 70% said it was easy or very easy to cut back, and 68% said they were more committed to going meatless on one day of the week.

Respondents said the biggest challenge was friend and family preferences for and/or eating habits around meat.

Participants were also surveyed at the start and end of the campaign. In all three surveys, health was the most common reason given for eating less meat.

At the end of the 12-week campaign, health fell as a reason while climate change, the environment, energy saving and water conservation moved up.

In the six-month follow-up survey, climate and environment fell slightly as reasons for reducing meat consumption but were still higher than at the start, according to the findings.

The study was presented last week at a meeting of the American Public Health Association, in Philadelphia.

Researchers noted that Bedford, N.Y., has a higher education and income level than the average U.S. community.

"As a result, the results skew toward higher awareness and smaller levels of behavior change because they were already eating less meat," said study author Becky Ramsing. She's a senior program officer at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future at the Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

"At the same time, the findings can help us understand which strategies may be most effective in building community awareness and action around food and climate," Ramsing said in a meeting news release.

Research presented at meetings is generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

Harvard Medical School offers tips on becoming a vegetarian.