24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
AHA News: Eat Healthy, Move Your Body During Pandemic'Stress Eating' While Social Distancing? Here's Tips to Avoid ItStaying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay ConnectedSoaking in a Hot Bath Might Do Your Heart GoodIndoor Athletes Often Lacking in Vitamin DHow Many Steps Per Day to Lengthen Your Life?Can You Buy Happiness? Yes, Study Suggests, If You Spend on ExperiencesAHA News: Coronavirus News on Social Media Stressing You Out? Here's How to Handle the AnxietyDon't Abandon Healthy Eating During Coronavirus PandemicAHA News: 'Be Happy' Isn't So Simple, Especially Amid Coronavirus Worries – But It's Seriously Good for HealthHealthy Living at Home to Ward Off CoronavirusKeeping Coronavirus Anxiety at BaySquat, Don't Sit: Study of African Tribe Shows Why One Position Is HealthierWill a Jolt of Java Get Your Creative Juices Flowing?Get Ready for Clocks to 'Spring Ahead'Erratic Sleep Habits May Boost Risk of Heart Problems: StudyFish Oil May Help Prevent Heart Disease, But Not Cancer: StudyDirty Air Cuts Millions of Lives Short Worldwide: StudyWant to Help Keep Diabetes at Bay? Brush & FlossAre Your Vaccinations Up to Date?Healthy Heart in Your 20s, Healthier Brain Decades LaterMore Than 4 in 10 Americans Are Now Obese: CDCHeading to Work on a Bike? You Might Live LongerIs Your Smartphone or Tablet an Injury Risk?How Safe Is It to Fly?Variety is Key for the Fittest AmericansFor Tracking Steps, Patients Stick With Phones, Not Wearable Devices: StudySocial Media Stokes Myths About Vaccines5 Expert Tips for Preventing Winter Sports AccidentsMany Americans Lack Knowledge, Not Desire, to Eat Plant-Based Diets'Couch Potato' Lifestyle Poses Danger to Women's Hearts5 Secrets to an Allergy-Free Valentine's DayRestful Romance: Smelling Your Lover's Shirt Can Help You SleepHow Does Social Media Shape Your Food Choices?AHA News: How a Happy Relationship Can Help Your HealthTexting While Walking Is Risky BusinessShovel That Snow, but Spare Your BackSpring Time Change Tied to More Fatal Car CrashesHealth Tip: Healthy Ways to Deal With SadnessEating Out: A Recipe for Poor Nutrition, Study FindsHealthy Living Helps Keep the Flu at BayNew Clues Show How Stress May Turn Your Hair GrayHealth Tip: Warning Signs of Drowsy DrivingAHA News: Can Social Media Be Good for Your Health?Sunscreen Chemicals Absorbed Into Body, Study FindsCould a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring WorseWhy Tidying Up Is Sometimes Harder Than ExpectedProbiotics: Don't Buy the Online HypePot-Using Drivers Still Impaired After the High Fades
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Get Ready for the Sleepiest Day of the Year

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Dec 28th 2019

new article illustration

SATURDAY, Dec. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- What's the sleepiest day of the year?

For a majority of Americans, that would be New Year's Day, according to a survey of 2,003 adults by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

The findings showed that 57 percent said they're more tired on Jan. 1 than on other holidays and times of the year, followed by the first day back at work in January (45%) and July 5 (41%).

As well as being the sleepiest day, New Year's Day is a good time to set healthy sleep goals for the coming year, the sleep experts said. Sleep improves well-being, fitness and productivity, and helps fight off infection, maintain a healthy weight and prevent chronic diseases.

Resolve to get enough sleep each night, AASM advises. Adults should sleep seven or more hours a night on a regular basis, but more than one-third of U.S. adults fall short of that, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The quality of your sleep is also important. Keep your bedroom free of distracting technology, or be sure to silence or turn off your cellphone and TV. Ideally, turn off devices at least 30 minutes before bedtime.

Avoid alcohol, caffeine or tobacco in the evening, and don't eat a large meal or exercise right before bed. Make a comfortable setting for sleep by keeping your bedroom dark and at a temperature that's good for sleeping. Most people sleep best at a cool temperature, according to the AASM.

Maintain a regular sleep routine, they advised in an academy news release. Try to wake up at the same time every morning and go to bed when you feel sleepy.

If lifestyle changes don't improve your sleep, talk to your health care provider about possible solutions.

If you have an ongoing sleep problem or struggle to stay awake during the day, the AASM recommends that you seek help. Common sleep disorders like insomnia and sleep apnea are treatable.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health offers a guide to healthy sleep.