24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Many Americans Lack Knowledge, Not Desire, to Eat Plant-Based DietsHealthy 'Mediterranean Diet' Is Good for Your MicrobiomeConsumers Waste Twice as Much Food as Experts ThoughtHow Does Social Media Shape Your Food Choices?Why Some High-Fiber Diets Cause Gas -- And What to Do About ItMeat Still Isn't Healthy, Study ConfirmsOne Egg Per Day Is Heart-Healthy, After AllAHA News: A Sweet Super Bowl Treat That Won't Sack Your HealthWant Fewer UTIs? Go Vegetarian, Study SuggestsDiets Rich in Fruits, Veggies Could Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sAHA News: Processed vs. Ultra-Processed Food, and Why It Matters to Your HealthEating Out: A Recipe for Poor Nutrition, Study FindsAmericans Toss Out Nearly a Third of Food at HomeAHA News: These Doctors Want to Write 'Farmacy' PrescriptionsHealth Tip: What to Know About TurmericCan Online Reviews Help Health Inspectors Keep Tabs on Restaurants?Health Tip: Healthy Eating for VegetariansAHA News: Before Grabbing a Grapefruit, Understand Its PowerCould a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?E. Coli Outbreak Over, CDC Lifts Advisory Against Certain Romaine LettuceHealth Tip: Apple Cider Vinegar Fast FactsCould Your Morning Coffee Be a Weight-Loss Tool?Green Tea Drinkers May Live LongerProcessed Foods Are Making Americans ObeseCalories Per Serving or the Whole Package? Many Food Labels Now Tell BothA Breakfast Fit for Making Your New Year's ResolutionsToast a Healthy New Year With These Holiday Cocktail RecipesBetter Choices for a Fast, Healthy LunchRecipes for Healthy Holiday Appetizers'Intermittent Fasting' Diet Could Boost Your HealthFatty Diets Tied to Leading Cause of Vision Loss in SeniorsRecipes for a Festive Holiday FeastDelicious Holiday Desserts With Fewer CaloriesAHA News: Own a Nutcracker? Turn Pecans Into a Festive TreatAHA News: Are You Drinking Enough During Winter Months?Unhealthy Eating Habits Cost U.S. $50 Billion a Year: StudyDo Processed Foods Up Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk?Could Carb-Heavy Meals Keep You From Good Sleep?What If 'Exercise Needed to Burn Off Calories' Was Included on Food Labeling?E. Coli Outbreak Spurs Packaged Salad WarningMore Than 100 E. Coli Illnesses Now Linked to Romaine LettuceAHA News: Vegan Diet May Decrease Heart Disease, Stroke Risk in African AmericansHealth Tip: Five Exercise and Nutrition MythsMore E. coli Illnesses Linked to Tainted Romaine LettucePlay It Safe With Holiday FoodsAHA News: Sweet Potatoes Are a Holiday Dish to Be Thankful ForAHA News: Regular Fasting Could Lead to Longer, Healthier LifeDon't Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif., Due to E. Coli: FDADon't Let Salmonella Make Your Thanksgiving a TurkeyPackaged Caesar Salad Suspected as Possible Source in E. coli Outbreak
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

AHA News: A Sweet Super Bowl Treat That Won't Sack Your Health


HealthDay News
Updated: Jan 30th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Nachos are as much a part of the Super Bowl tradition as sports channel hype and over-the-top halftime shows. Unfortunately, traditional cheese-goo-on-fried-chips nachos are a totally blown call nutritionally.

So, as you make plans for the big game, consider apple nachos – a sweet, vegan alternative that won't blitz your health.

"There are so many things to love about this recipe, which gives you plant-based protein, fiber and heart-healthy fats," said Deanne Kelleher, a registered dietitian and academic specialist at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

The recipe has sunflower seeds, almonds and peanut butter, all of which contain potassium. "Potassium helps with your blood pressure and muscles and your overall health, and we don't get enough of it in our diet," she said.

Apples – the main ingredient – keep the doctor away, as the old saying goes.

"Having whole fruit, including the skin, is so much better than fruit juice. It provides complex carbs and fiber, which helps us feel full and gives us a more even blood sugar throughout the day," Kelleher said.

Aside from a tiny amount of honey, the recipe punts any added sugar, which has zero nutrients but lots of extra calories.

"People already have too much added sugar every day," she said. "Added sugar isn't necessary in this recipe. The fruit itself is naturally sweet."

Apple Nachos

  • 1/3 cup dried, unsweetened cranberries or raisins
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds (unsalted)
  • 2 Tbsp hulled, unsalted sunflower seeds
  • 3 red or green apples, cored and thinly sliced into about 12 pieces each
  • 1-2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • 1/4 cup reduced-fat, smooth peanut butter
  • 1 Tbsp honey

In a small bowl, combine dried cranberries or raisins, almonds and sunflower seeds.

Core each apple and thinly slice into about 12 pieces each. Layer half the apples onto a large plate or platter. If the apple slices will be sitting out for a while, sprinkle a little lemon juice over them to prevent browning.

Using the microwave or a teapot, bring 2 tablespoons water to a boil. In a small bowl, combine hot water, peanut butter and honey. Use a spoon and stir until mixture is smooth.

Use the spoon to drizzle half the peanut butter mixture over the plated apple slices; sprinkle with half the cranberry mixture. Layer the remaining apples on top and repeat with remaining peanut butter and cranberry mixture. Serve.

Cooking tip: When using sticky substances like honey or peanut butter in a recipe, coat the measuring spoon or measuring cup with cooking spray for easier removal.