24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
FDA OKs Generic Asthma Inhaler in Face of Coronavirus-Related ShortagesNewborns With COVID-19 May Suffer Only Mild Symptoms, Study SaysAre Steroids Really the Answer for Arthritic Knees?Many Americans Will Grieve Parents, Grandparents Lost to CoronavirusTouching Your Face Is a Coronavirus Danger: Tips to Help You StopBlack Americans Appear Most Vulnerable as U.S. Coronavirus Deaths Near 13,000More COVID-19 Tests Arrive, But Bottlenecks PersistAHA News: What Pregnant Women With High Blood Pressure Need to Know About COVID-19AHA News: Pandemic Puts Health Care Workers' Mental Health on the LineU.S. Study Finds COVID-19 Seldom Severe in KidsHigh-Tech Rings Are Tracking COVID-19 'Warning Signs'Beware of 'Media Overload' During Coronavirus Crisis, Experts SayYou're Wearing a Face Mask -- Are You Wearing It Correctly?What Material Is Best for Your DIY Face Mask? The Answer May Surprise YouAs U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll Nears 11,000, Signs Show Pandemic May Be PeakingWhy Will It Take So Long for a COVID-19 Vaccine?Pregnant Women Need to Guard Against CoronavirusCollege Students Feeling the Strain of Social DistancingHow One Patient's Battle With COVID-19 Changed U.S. Testing ProtocolsMission Possible: Tips for Safe Grocery Shopping During the PandemicTrials Begin for Potential COVID-19 Drug RemdesivirSchool Closures Will Force Many U.S. Health Care Workers to Stay HomeWith Coronavirus a Threat, Stop Wearing Contact LensesSome Steroid Meds May Raise Coronavirus RiskAmericans Got the Memo on Social Distancing, Poll ShowsCDC Urges All Americans to Wear Face Masks as Death Count RisesAHA News: Amid Coronavirus Crisis, Exercise Caution When Exercising OutdoorsAsthma, COPD Raise Odds for Severe COVID-19, Lung Experts WarnCoronavirus Hangs Around Even After Symptoms SubsideCan Food From an Infected Cook Give You COVID-19?Pregnant Women Need to Guard Against CoronavirusVitamin D Might Aid Seniors' Recovery From Hip Fracture: StudyWith 3D Printer, N.Y. Hospital Converts Sleep Apnea Machines Into VentilatorsAnother COVID-19 Vaccine Being Tested in Mice'Stay at Home' Orders Are Stressing U.S. Families, Survey ShowsAn Expert's Guide to Fighting Coronavirus StressHeart Patients Need to Be Wary of CoronavirusU.S. Coronavirus Cases Pass 200,000, as Jobless Claims Soar to 10 MillionIs Thyroid Hormone Dangerously Overprescribed in Older Patients?'Pink Eye' Often a Symptom of COVID-19, and Infection Via Tears PossibleMild COVID-19 Often Appears With Only Gastro Symptoms: StudyFDA Pulls Heartburn Drug Zantac From MarketCertain Health Conditions Up Risks for Severe COVID-19Parents, Arm Your Kids Against COVID-19 With Good Hand-Washing HabitsFDA Approves Malaria Drugs to Treat COVID-19, Despite Little Proof They Work'Fever Tracker' Suggests Social Distancing Is Already WorkingDon't Fall Prey to COVID-19 ScammersBeing Chained to Your Desk Might Harm Your ThyroidWhat You Should Know If Your Surgery Has Been Put on HoldAnother Coronavirus Health Threat: Too Few Asthma Inhalers
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Study Finds 'No Clear Rationale' for 45% of Antibiotic Prescriptions

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 7th 2020

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Feb. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of antibiotic prescriptions for Medicaid patients appear to be inappropriate, new research suggests.

That kind of overprescribing raises risks for everyone, experts say, as bacteria gain more chances to mutate around the life-saving drugs.

For the study, researchers analyzed 298 million antibiotic prescriptions filled by 53 million Medicaid patients between 2004 and 2013. They found that 45% were ordered without any clear rationale.

Specifically, 17% were prescribed at an office visit in which the patient wasn't diagnosed with a bacterial infection, and 28% were prescribed without an office visit.

"Indiscriminate use of antibiotics is increasing the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and rendering them ineffective," said senior author Dr. Jeffrey Linder, chief of general internal medicine and geriatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

"It's concerning that nearly half of antibiotics are prescribed without a visit or without a clear rationale," he added in a university news release. "We are not keeping track of and do not have a system to ensure high-quality antibiotic prescribing in the U.S."

The study was published in the February issue of the journal Health Affairs.

The study's lead author, Dr. Michael Fischer, is an associate professor at Harvard Medical School. He said, "If we're thinking about how to improve antibiotic use, we need to understand the context in which antibiotics are being prescribed. If prescribing is taking place outside of an office visit, most of the approaches we're taking to combat antibiotic overuse will miss those completely."

A key question remains unanswered: Under what circumstances were antibiotics prescribed without a visit to the health care provider?

The study was based on insurance claims and not on medical records, Fischer said, so researchers don't know what interactions took place between patients and prescribing doctors.

"We assume that most of these prescriptions were associated with a telephone interaction, although some communication may have occurred over email, via web portals or in informal, uncaptured visits," he said. "Most of these encounters would be blind spots for the interventions designed to improve antibiotic use."

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on antibiotics.