24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Multiple Surgeries for Cleft Lip, Palate Won't Cause Major Psychological DamageHIV May Not Worsen COVID-19 OutlookU.S. Coronavirus Hospitalizations Spiking in South, WestAHA News: To Everything There Is a Season, Including Heart DiseaseAsthma, Allergies Plus Pandemic May Pose 4th of July ChallengesStroke Appears 8 Times More Likely With COVID Than With FluCOVID-19 Death Risk Twice as High in New York City as Some CountriesFireworks Are Bad News for Your LungsScientists Find Source of COVID ClotsNew U.S. Coronavirus Cases Top 50,000 as More States Slow Reopening PlansNumbers of Non-COVID-19 Deaths Up During PandemicNo Good Evidence on Accuracy of Coronavirus Antibody Tests: StudyAHA News: COVID-19 Pandemic Brings New Concerns About Excessive DrinkingMuscle Relaxants for Back Pain Are Soaring: Are They Safe?Trauma of Racism Fuels High Blood Pressure Among Black Americans: StudyCOVID-19 Blood Test Might Predict Who Will Need a VentilatorWhat's the Best DIY Face Mask Against COVID-19?Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study FindsU.S. Could See 100,000 New Cases of COVID-19 Each Day, Fauci SaysGlobally, COVID-19 Cases May Stretch Far Beyond Official Numbers: StudyFBI: Beware of Scammers Selling Fake COVID-19 Antibody TestsAHA News: Sadness and Isolation of Pandemic Can Make Coping With Grief HarderVaping-Related Lung Injuries Still Happening -- And May Look Like COVID-19Most With Coronavirus Not Sure How They Caught It: CDCDon't Get Sick While Swimming This SummerAmid Pandemic, Too Many Americans Are Hesitating to Call 911Mask Up! Don't Let Down Your Guard Against COVID-19Wildfire Smoke Causes Rapid Damage to Your Health: StudyCOVID Drug Remdesivir Could Cost Up to $3,120 Per Patient, Maker SaysIntestinal Illness Spurs Recall of Bagged Salads Sold at Walmart, AldiCOVID Threatens the 3 out of 4 Americans Who Can't Work From HomeHispanic Americans Being Hit Hard By COVID-19Global Coronavirus Cases Pass 10 Million as U.S. Struggles With Surge in InfectionsStarted Early, Drug Combo Eases Fatigue of Rheumatoid Arthritis: StudyIs 'Pooled' Coronavirus Testing the Next Step for America?U.S. Coronavirus Task Force Warns of Rising Case Numbers, Especially Among YoungWho's at Highest Risk From COVID-19? CDC Updates Its ListStroke, Confusion: COVID-19 Often Impacts the Brain, Study ShowsPromising Results Mean Coronavirus Vaccine Trial Could Start by AugustWhen Can Sports Fans Safely Fill Stadiums Again?Coronavirus Baby Boom? Survey Says Maybe NotCOVID-19 Typically Mild for Babies: StudyU.S. Reports Record Rise in New Coronavirus CasesAHA News: COVID-19 Highlights Long-Term Inequities in Some CommunitiesHow the Saharan Dust Plume Could Make Your Allergies WorseAmid Pandemic, Fears That Older Americans Are Feeling 'Expendable''The Lockdowns Worked,' Experts Say, But Did America Reopen Too Soon?Asymptomatic Coronavirus Carriers Can Shed Virus on Surfaces: StudyVaccine Might Guard Against Bacteria That Cause Diarrhea in KidsOne-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in Mice
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Nearly 40% of Hospitalizations in U.S. COVID-19 Cases Involve Adults Under 55

HealthDay News
by By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Mar 19th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, March 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As the battle against coronavirus continues in the United States, new government data suggests that every American, old and young, is at risk of severe illness.

Nearly 4 in every 10 cases requiring hospitalization involved people under the age of 55, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers examined outcomes for the 4,226 cases of non-imported COVID-19 reported in the United States as of March 16.

Similar to earlier data out of China, 80% of people who died were at or above 65, "with the highest percentage of severe outcomes among persons aged 85 years [or older]," wrote the CDC's COVID-19 Response Team.

That's not unexpected, since it's long been understood that age -- and the chronic health issues that often accompany it -- are major risk factors for fatalities from COVID-19.

But the study also found a higher-than-expected rate of hospitalization, including admission to the ICU, among much younger patients.

For example, among hospitalized cases, 38% were aged between 20 and 54, the report found. And among those most critical cases -- those requiring admission to an ICU -- 12% were for patients ages 20 to 44, and 36% were for patients between 45 and 64, the CDC team said.

Less than 1% of hospitalized patients were under the age of 19, the report found, and there were no deaths in that age group.

Why the unexpectedly high number of serious cases in younger adults? The answer isn't yet clear, the researchers said, and they stress that "no data on serious underlying health conditions were available." So, younger people with certain health issues might be at greater risk -- but data to confirm that isn't yet available.

Speaking at a White House briefing earlier this week, virologist and coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx stressed that "you could be 40 and have a significant medical condition and be at substantial risk. You could be 30 and having come through Hodgkin's disease, or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and be at significant risk. So, there are risk groups in every age group."

Certainly the early findings published Wednesday "demonstrate that severe illness leading to hospitalization, including ICU admission and death, can occur in adults of any age with COVID-19," the CDC authors said.

"I think everyone should be paying attention to this," Stephen Morse, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, told The New York Times. "It's not just going to be the elderly. There will be people age 20 and up. They do have to be careful, even if they think that they're young and healthy."

The finding also hints that if so many younger adults are ending up in hospitals due to coronavirus infection, that may only be the tip of the iceberg -- many thousands more may have asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic illness.

Dr. Christopher Carlsten is head of respiratory medicine at the University of British Columbia in Canada. Speaking with the Times, he said that "younger people may feel more confident about their ability to withstand a virus like this. [But] if that many younger people are being hospitalized, that means that there are a lot of young people in the community that are walking around with the infection."

And that formed the crux of a plea earlier this week to young American adults from Birx.

"Millennials are the key, because they are the ones that are out and about, and they are the ones that are most likely to be in social gatherings, and they are the ones that are most likely to be asymptomatic," she told reporters at the Monday White House briefing.

"The millennials can help us tremendously," Birx added. "Millennials can speak to one another about how important it is in this moment to protect all of the people."

As of Thursday, total U.S. cases of coronavirus infection passed 9,000, with 149 deaths recorded. As of Tuesday, the WHO had reported nearly 208,000 cases of coronavirus across 166 countries and territories, including over 8,600 deaths.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on the new coronavirus.