24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
U.S. Coronavirus Cases Near 3 Million as Hospitals in Sun Belt Fill Up With PatientsAHA News: Months After Infection, Many COVID-19 Patients Can't Shake IllnessCoronavirus Ups Anxiety, Depression in the LGBTQ CommunityMajor Medical Groups Urge Americans to Wear Face MasksBlack Patients Fare Worse After AngioplastyHow Immune System Fights COVID-19 May Be Key to Vaccine SuccessWill the COVID-19 Pandemic Leave a Mental Health Crisis in Its Wake?New U.S. Coronavirus Cases Hit Another HighMultiple Surgeries for Cleft Lip, Palate Won't Cause Major Psychological DamageHIV May Not Worsen COVID-19 OutlookU.S. Coronavirus Hospitalizations Spiking in South, WestAHA News: To Everything There Is a Season, Including Heart DiseaseAsthma, Allergies Plus Pandemic May Pose 4th of July ChallengesStroke Appears 8 Times More Likely With COVID Than With FluCOVID-19 Death Risk Twice as High in New York City as Some CountriesFireworks Are Bad News for Your LungsScientists Find Source of COVID ClotsNew U.S. Coronavirus Cases Top 50,000 as More States Slow Reopening PlansNumbers of Non-COVID-19 Deaths Up During PandemicNo Good Evidence on Accuracy of Coronavirus Antibody Tests: StudyAHA News: COVID-19 Pandemic Brings New Concerns About Excessive DrinkingMuscle Relaxants for Back Pain Are Soaring: Are They Safe?Trauma of Racism Fuels High Blood Pressure Among Black Americans: StudyCOVID-19 Blood Test Might Predict Who Will Need a VentilatorWhat's the Best DIY Face Mask Against COVID-19?Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study FindsU.S. Could See 100,000 New Cases of COVID-19 Each Day, Fauci SaysGlobally, COVID-19 Cases May Stretch Far Beyond Official Numbers: StudyFBI: Beware of Scammers Selling Fake COVID-19 Antibody TestsAHA News: Sadness and Isolation of Pandemic Can Make Coping With Grief HarderVaping-Related Lung Injuries Still Happening -- And May Look Like COVID-19Most With Coronavirus Not Sure How They Caught It: CDCDon't Get Sick While Swimming This SummerAmid Pandemic, Too Many Americans Are Hesitating to Call 911Mask Up! Don't Let Down Your Guard Against COVID-19Wildfire Smoke Causes Rapid Damage to Your Health: StudyCOVID Drug Remdesivir Could Cost Up to $3,120 Per Patient, Maker SaysIntestinal Illness Spurs Recall of Bagged Salads Sold at Walmart, AldiCOVID Threatens the 3 out of 4 Americans Who Can't Work From HomeHispanic Americans Being Hit Hard By COVID-19Global Coronavirus Cases Pass 10 Million as U.S. Struggles With Surge in InfectionsStarted Early, Drug Combo Eases Fatigue of Rheumatoid Arthritis: StudyIs 'Pooled' Coronavirus Testing the Next Step for America?U.S. Coronavirus Task Force Warns of Rising Case Numbers, Especially Among YoungWho's at Highest Risk From COVID-19? CDC Updates Its ListStroke, Confusion: COVID-19 Often Impacts the Brain, Study ShowsPromising Results Mean Coronavirus Vaccine Trial Could Start by AugustWhen Can Sports Fans Safely Fill Stadiums Again?Coronavirus Baby Boom? Survey Says Maybe NotCOVID-19 Typically Mild for Babies: Study
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Hydroxychloroquine May Worsen Odds for Cancer Patients With COVID-19

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 28th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As the evidence piles up that a malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment by President Donald Trump may instead harm patients, a new study shows the same might hold true for cancer patients with COVID-19.

Researchers found that cancer patients with COVID-19 who receive both hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin have a higher risk of death than those who aren't given the two drugs.

Of the 928 patients in the study, 13% died within 30 days of being diagnosed with COVID-19. After adjusting for certain factors, the researchers concluded that patients with progressing cancer were 5.2 times more likely to die within 30 days than those in remission or with no evidence of cancer.

Patients who received the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin to treat COVID-19 had a nearly threefold higher risk of death within 30 days than those who didn't receive either drug, the investigators found.

Patients who received the two drugs and later died were more likely to: have had slightly reduced daily physical function; have received cancer therapy less than 2 weeks before being diagnosed with COVID-19; have Rh-positive blood type; be of non-Hispanic ethnicity; and to be taking cholesterol-lowering statins.

The study will be presented virtually at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Such research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

"This is early and evolving data, and more time and analysis will be needed to confirm and expand on these findings," said lead author Dr. Jeremy Warner, an associate professor of medicine and biomedical informatics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn.

"Right now, we're working to quickly get information about why some patients with cancer become infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus and identify the factors that affect disease severity and death. We're also interested in the effects of treatments that are being used to treat patients with cancer who have COVID-19," Warner said in an ASCO news release.

"While these findings are provocative, we believe that … carefully planned prospective studies are needed to truly demonstrate the risk or benefit of these drugs," Warner added.

Safety concerns over hydroxychloroquine prompted the World Health Organization to remove the drug from a global trial of potential COVID-19 therapies earlier this week.

Several other studies have also found the medication has no benefit and could possibly harm COVID-19 patients.

Still, Trump said on Sunday he had just finished taking a two-week course of the malaria drug to guard against COVID-19 infection after two White House staffers tested positive for the coronavirus.

In the meantime, ASCO president Dr. Howard Burris III said more research is needed into the care of cancer patients stricken by COVID-19.

"The cancer care community urgently needs data on the effects of COVID-19, specifically in patients with cancer," he said. "How we improve the care we provide these patients and reduce the number of deaths and severe consequences associated with this disease are among the top questions."

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on COVID-19 and cancer.