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AHA News: A Healthier Frozen Treat for Hot Summer Days


HealthDay News
Updated: Jun 30th 2020

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TUESDAY, June 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Want to beat the heat with a cold treat this summer? Consider a healthy frozen yogurt pop with peaches.

"It's a tasty low-calorie recipe that provides protein, potassium and calcium that is also kid-friendly and easy to prepare," said Linda Van Horn, a registered dietitian and chief of the nutrition division at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

These homemade pops contain just three ingredients: A smidgen of honey, a 16-ounce package of frozen peaches, and one cup of plain, fat-free yogurt. "Many other yogurts on the market can contribute double the calories, fat and sugar," Van Horn said.

Peaches – the main ingredient – have potassium and vitamin A, as well as fiber. "Frozen unsweetened peaches are especially useful, but fresh or unsweetened canned peaches or any other fruit could also be used," she said. "Fruits that are especially tasty in a frozen dessert are strawberries, blueberries and raspberries, or tropical fruits such as mango, pineapple, guava or papaya."

At a time when many people are carefully watching their budget – and maybe their waistline – these homemade pops give you more bang for the buck.

"At 66 cents per serving, they are less than half the cost of commercial options," Van Horn said. "At the same time, they're a sweet, refreshing treat that is nutritious and very low in sugar compared to popular sugar-sweetened popsicles and commercial frozen yogurt bars."

Homemade Frozen Yogurt Pops With Peaches

  • 1 16-ounce package frozen unsweetened peach slices, thawed, divided use
  • 1 cup fat-free, plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Put 1 1/2 cups peaches, the yogurt and honey in the bowl of a food processor. Process for about 1 minute or until the mixture is pureed. (You also can put the ingredients in a large bowl and use an immersion blender to puree.)

Transfer the puree to a bowl or large liquid measuring cup with a spout. Chop the remaining peaches into bite-size pieces. Stir into the puree, along with any liquid from the package.

Pour the mixture into popsicle molds, filling each one almost to the top. Freeze overnight.

At serving time, hold the popsicle molds under warm running water to loosen the popsicles.

Tip: Don't have popsicle molds or sticks? Pour the mixture into an ice cube tray. Cover it with plastic wrap. Push a toothpick through the wrap and into the center of each cube. When the cubes are frozen, pull off the plastic wrap for bite-size popsicles.