24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Could the Pill Reduce Asthma Attacks?Coronavirus Most Contagious Soon After InfectionPeople Should Know That COVID Vaccine Might Spur Transient Sickness: CDC ExpertsAnother Study Finds COVID Usually Mild in KidsBlacks, Hispanics Account for More Than Half of COVID Deaths: StudyCollege Kid Coming Home for Thanksgiving? Here's How to Keep Your Family SafeParents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study FindsVegan Diets Tied to Higher Bone Fracture RiskThird COVID Vaccine Shows Effectiveness; FDA Approves New TreatmentWhich Kids With COVID Will Get Very Sick?Add Kids to COVID Vaccine Trials, Pediatricians' Group SaysLosing Your Hair Because of Pandemic Stress?How Hospitals Can Cut Patients' FallsMany Young Americans Lonely, Depressed During Pandemic: SurveyWHO Says No to Remdesivir as COVID-19 TreatmentBirx Says U.S. COVID Cases Are Skyrocketing as Holidays ApproachA 'Stunning' Alternative Rx for Arthritic Joints?Are Statin Side Effects 'All in Your Head'?Stay Home This Holiday, CDC and Medical Groups UrgeDirty Air Endangers Homeless People: StudyU.S. Coronavirus Deaths Top a Quarter MillionOxford COVID Vaccine Safe, Effective, Especially in Older AdultsAre High-Dose Blood Thinners Needed for Severe COVID-19?Childhood Lead Exposure Tied to Brain Changes in Middle AgeWith Cold Weather Forcing Patrons Inside, How Safe Are Restaurants?AHA News: Fauci Offers a COVID-19 Lesson and Looks to the Future'A Struggle:' Physical, Mental Ills Can Linger Months After COVID RecoveryExoskeleton Helps Paralyzed People Walk AgainAre You Feeling 'Pandemic Fatigue'?Chinese COVID Vaccine Appears Safe, EffectiveFDA Approves First Rapid COVID Test for Home UseCould Night Shifts Raise Asthma Risk?AHA News: Black, Hispanic People Hospitalized for COVID-19 at Disproportionately High RatesAHA News: COVID-19 Patients of All Ages With Obesity Face Higher Risk of Complications, DeathOverweight With Arthritic Knees? You Might Want to Avoid TennisAnswers to Your Questions About Face MasksHow to Be a Living Liver DonorCoronavirus Immunity Might Last at Least 6 MonthsCalifornia, Iowa Toughen Restrictions as COVID Cases ClimbAllergies Won't Up Your Odds for Severe COVIDCombo 'Polypill' May Cut Heart Attack, Stroke Risk Up to 40%Restful Sleep Could Help Ward Off Heart FailureMany Americans Plan to Party Indoors, Regardless of Risk: SurveyDeadly New Ebola-Like Disease Emerges in BoliviaModerna Vaccine Shows 94.5% Effectiveness Against COVIDGlobal Warming Has Ticks Jumping From Dogs to HumansMore Evidence That Vaping Ups Lung Disease RiskAHA News: Heart Risk Factors Vary Greatly Among Asian ImmigrantsWrongly Prescribing Antibiotics Sets Dangerous PatternLarge Study Finds Blacks, Asians More Vulnerable to COVID
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

Smog Could Increase COVID-19 Deaths by 15% Worldwide

HealthDay News
by Steven Reinberg
Updated: Oct 29th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term exposure to air pollution is tied to an increased risk of dying from COVID-19, a new study finds.

About 15% of deaths from COVID-19 worldwide could be due to long-term exposure to air pollution, the researchers said. In Europe, the proportion was about 19%, in North America about 17% and in East Asia about 27%.

These proportions are an estimate of "the fraction of COVID-19 deaths that could be avoided if the population was exposed to lower counterfactual air pollution levels without fossil fuel-related and other anthropogenic [caused by humans] emissions," the team of German scientists reported.

But this "attributable fraction does not imply a direct cause-effect relationship between air pollution and COVID-19 mortality (although it is possible)," the study authors added in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology.

For the study, the researchers used data from previous U.S. and Chinese studies of air pollution and COVID-19, the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak in 2003, and additional data from Italy. The investigators combined this with satellite data showing global exposure to fine particles known as "particulate matter" that are less than or equal to 2.5 microns in diameter -- called PM2.5.

"When people inhale polluted air, the very small polluting particles, the PM2.5, migrate from the lungs to the blood and blood vessels, causing inflammation and severe oxidative stress, which is an imbalance between free radicals and oxidants in the body that normally repair damage to cells," said researcher Thomas Munzel, from the University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, in Mainz.

"This causes damage to the inner lining of arteries, the endothelium, and leads to the narrowing and stiffening of the arteries. The COVID-19 virus also enters the body via the lungs, causing similar damage to blood vessels, and it is now considered to be an endothelial disease," Munzel said.

According to the report, "A lesson from our environmental perspective of the COVID-19 pandemic is that the quest for effective policies to reduce anthropogenic emissions, which cause both air pollution and climate change, needs to be accelerated. The pandemic ends with the vaccination of the population or with herd immunity through extensive infection of the population. However, there are no vaccines against poor air quality and climate change. The remedy is to mitigate emissions," the researchers said.

"The transition to a green economy with clean, renewable energy sources will further both environmental and public health locally through improved air quality and globally by limiting climate change," the team concluded.

The study was published online Oct. 26 in the journal Cardiovascular Research.

More information

For more on pollution and lung health, head to the American Lung Association.



-- Steve Reinberg




SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, Oct. 26, 2020