24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
(800)421-8825
Fax: (361)578-5500

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Junk Food, Booze Often Star in America's Hit MoviesCoping With Lockdown Loneliness During the HolidaysMany Young Americans Lonely, Depressed During Pandemic: SurveyStay Home This Holiday, CDC and Medical Groups UrgeElection Outcome Hasn't Lowered Americans' Stress Levels: PollWith Cold Weather Forcing Patrons Inside, How Safe Are Restaurants?Are You Feeling 'Pandemic Fatigue'?What the Pandemic Did to WorkoutsBirth Control Pill Won't Raise Depression RiskAHA News: Despite the Pandemic, Keep Social Connections Strong This Holiday SeasonTips to Cope With Lockdown as Cold Weather ArrivesGreen Spaces Do a Heart GoodLiving Healthy Good for Your Heart, Even if You're on MedsWho Are The Loneliest Americans? The Answer May Surprise YouMultivitamins' 'Benefits' Are All in Your Head: StudyDid Your Candidate Lose the Election? Study Finds Depression May FollowThink 'Virtual' for Family Gatherings During the HolidaysNearly 1 in 5 Americans Follows 'Special' DietCoping With the Stress of This ElectionUpbeat Outlook Could Shield Your BrainTips for a Healthier Holiday SeasonGot Election Anxiety? Experts Have Coping TipsMost Americans Want to End Seasonal Time Changes: SurveyPandemic Putting Americans Under Great Mental Strain: PollAHA News: Your Pandemic Hobby Might Be Doing More Good Than You KnowHazardous Ingredients Make 'Smart Drug' Supplements a Not-So-Smart BuyAmericans Are Cutting Back on Sugary DrinksToo Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your BrainA Good Workout Could Boost Your Thinking for Up to 2 HoursSimply Smiling May Boost Your OutlookWho's Most Likely to Binge Eat Amid Pandemic?AHA News: In These Tough Times, Focus on ResilienceEating in the Evening Could Be Bad for Your HealthER Visits for E-Scooter Injuries Nearly Double in One YearCould Long Naps Shorten Your Life?Why Some Gifts Are Better-Received Than OthersBest Ways to Beat the HeatEducation Benefits the Brain Over a LifetimeAnother COVID Hazard: False InformationSocial Distancing? Your Paycheck Plays a RoleIs Your Home Workstation Hurting You?Many Stay Optimistic Until Old Age HitsMany Americans Pause Social Media as National Tensions RiseAfter Lockdown, Ease Back Into ExerciseFor a Longer Life, Any Exercise Is Good Exercise: StudyUnder 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May RiseMore Americans Turning to Artificial Sweeteners, But Is That a Healthy Move?Don't Forget Good Sleep Habits During SummerExpert Tips to Help You Beat the HeatCould Vegetables Be the Fountain of Youth?
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Birth Control Pill Won't Raise Depression Risk

HealthDay News
by Cara Murez
Updated: Nov 12th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Women who struggle with mental health problems will sometimes forgo the most effective forms of birth control because of concerns about worsening those issues, but a new study delivers a reassuring finding: The pill and other forms of hormonal birth control do not raise depression risk.

"This is a very common concern," explained senior study author Dr. Jessica Kiley, chief of general obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

"For some patients with anxiety disorders, when you discuss a contraceptive's potential side effect, they get very worried. We're hoping to encourage women to focus on their contraceptive needs and learn about options that are unlikely to cause depression," Kiley said.

The hormonal contraceptives the study authors discussed include birth control pills, IUDs (intrauterine devices) and vaginal rings.

The study, which was published online Nov. 10 in the American Journal of Psychiatry, is a comprehensive review of published research of birth control methods for women with psychiatric disorders.

According to corresponding author Dr. Katherine Wisner, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and obstetrics & gynecology at Northwestern, "When you review the entirety of the literature and ask, 'Do hormonal contraceptives cause depression?,' the answer is definitely no." Wisner is also director of the Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders.

Clinical studies and trials of women with psychiatric disorders have found similar rates of mood symptoms in women regardless of whether they were using hormonal contraceptives or not. In some cases, the contraceptives may even stabilize the mood symptoms of women with psychiatric disorders, the study authors said.

And the physical and mental stress of an unintended pregnancy could trigger a new and recurrent bout of depression, including postpartum depression, Wisner added.

The review authors hope the findings will lead to more collaboration between gynecologists and psychiatrists, who can work together to help their mutual patients. Psychiatrists don't typically receive enough training on contraceptives to properly counsel women on their birth control choices, according to the report. And women also should be screened for depression at routine gynecological appointments, Wisner said.

"Women should know they always have access to many types of birth control, regardless of their history or likelihood of mental illness," Wisner said. "They shouldn't feel like they're out there flailing on how to not get pregnant."

It is important to get a baseline sense of a woman's mental health before contraceptive use, so her psychiatrist can monitor her symptoms after starting it, Wisner added. This is especially critical for women with bipolar disorder, who have mood fluctuations around their menstrual cycle, she explained in a university news release.

Although interactions between psychiatric drugs and contraceptives are infrequent, doctors do need to be aware of important exceptions, Wisner said.

Those exceptions include the antipsychotic clozapine and the bipolar/seizure drug carbamazepine, which can sometimes interfere with certain contraceptives, Wisner said. Natural compounds such as St. John's Wort may also decrease the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives.

More information

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America offers information and resources for people with these conditions.


SOURCE: Northwestern University, news release, Nov. 10, 2020