24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia RiskDementia Risk Rises as Years Lived With Type 2 Diabetes IncreasesHead Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar WaysBrain Injuries Raise Long-Term Risk of StrokeResearch Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer'sAssisted Living Centers Can Do More for Dementia Patients, Experts SayDiminished Hearing, Vision Together Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia6 Steps to Reduce Caregiver StressLoneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer'sDrug Used in Cancer Patients Might Help Treat Alzheimer's'Non-Drug' Approaches Can Fight Depression in People With DementiaSuicide Attempts Spike Soon After Dementia DiagnosisCould a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?AHA News: Dementia May Be a Risk Factor for Infection But Not Death From COVID-19Your Eyes May Signal Your Risk for Stroke, DementiaEven 1 Concussion May Raise Your Odds for Dementia LaterAlzheimer's Patients Are Being Given Too Many MedsMany Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia StrikesAlzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different WaysHistory of Mental Illness Tied to Earlier Onset of Alzheimer's DiseaseAHA News: Black, Hispanic Families Hit Hardest by DementiaWhy Some 'Super Ager' Folks Keep Their Minds Dementia-FreeDementia Seen in Younger Adults Shows Even More Brain Damage Than Alzheimer'sToo Little Sleep Could Raise Your Dementia RiskSpecialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural AmericansTony Bennett's Struggle With Alzheimer's RevealedFluid-Filled Spaces in the Brain Linked to Worsening MemoryCOVID Vaccine Advised for Alzheimer's Patients, Their CaregiversAphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory LossCaregivers Feeling the Strain This Tough Holiday SeasonYears Before Diagnosis, People With Alzheimer's Lose Financial AcumenCould Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?Strong Sleeping Pills Tied to Falls, Fractures in Dementia PatientsAnxiety Might Speed Alzheimer's: StudyPre-Op 'Brain Games' Might Prevent Post-Op DeliriumDoes Hard Work Help Preserve the Brain?Staying Active as You Age Not a Guarantee Against DementiaSmog Tied to Raised Risk for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's DiseasePoor Brain Blood Flow Might Spur 'Tangles' of Alzheimer'sIs Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?A-Fib Treatment Reduces Patients' Dementia RiskFall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early StagesPTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia RiskNew Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's RiskIs Rural Appalachia a Hotspot for Alzheimer's?Why Are Dementia Patients Getting Risky Psychiatric Drugs?Get Dizzy When Standing Up? It Could Be Risk Factor for DementiaCan Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer'sUnder 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Strong Sleeping Pills Tied to Falls, Fractures in Dementia Patients

HealthDay News
by Steven Reinberg
Updated: Nov 25th 2020

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Strong sleeping pills known as "Z-drugs" may increase the risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, British researchers report.

People with dementia can have trouble sleeping and are often prescribed drugs such as zaleplon (Sonata), zolpidem (Ambien) and zopiclone to help them nod off, but higher doses of these drugs can have negative effects.

"As many as 90% of people with dementia suffer sleep disturbances and it has a big impact on their mental and physical health, as well as that of their carers," said Chris Fox, from the University of East Anglia's Norwich Medical School.

"Z-drugs are commonly prescribed to help people sleep. However, these medicines were never licensed for dementia, and they have been associated with adverse events such as falls and fracture risks in older people," Fox said in a university news release.

For the study, the researchers collected data on more than 27,000 patients in England diagnosed with dementia between 2000 and 2016. Their average age was 83. More than 3,500 had been prescribed Z-drugs.

"We studied a range of adverse outcomes including fractures, falls, deep vein thrombosis [clots], stroke and death, over two years. And we were particularly interested to see whether higher doses led to worse outcomes," Fox said.

"For patients prescribed Z-drugs, 17% were given higher doses. And we found that these patients on higher doses were more at risk of falls and fractures, particularly hip fractures, and stroke, compared with patients who were not taking any medication for sleep disturbance," Fox said. These effects were not seen at low doses of the drugs.

"This research shows us that higher-dose Z-drugs should be avoided, if possible, in people living with dementia, and non-pharmacological alternatives preferentially considered," Fox said.

However, patients taking higher doses of these drugs shouldn't stop taking them suddenly, but seek advice from their doctor, the researchers noted.

Higher-dose Z-drugs were defined as equivalent to 7.5 mg or higher of zopiclone. Zopiclone is no longer available in the United States.

The report was published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine.

More information

For more on dementia, head to the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

SOURCE: University of East Anglia, news release, Nov. 23, 2020