24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Get Your '5 a Day' Fruits and Veggies to Live LongerMediterranean Diet Could Keep Aging Brains SharpSwitch to Plant-Based Diet Could Protect Older Women's BrainsAHA News: Lower Your Sodium, and Blood Pressure Will FollowDaily Coffee Tied to Lower Risk for Heart FailureAHA News: Avocados Are a Healthy Option Super Bowl Sunday – and Year-RoundMany U.S. Adults Aren't Getting Healthy Amounts of Fruits, VegetablesWhole Wheat Better for You Than White Bread, Study ConfirmsWhat's the Most Nutritious Way to Juice Your Vegetables?Pandemic May Be Affecting How Parents Feed Their KidsOmega-3s From Fish Might Curb Asthma in Kids, But Genes MatterAHA News: 5 Things Nutrition Experts Want You to Know About New Federal Dietary GuidelinesJust 2% of U.S. Teens Eat Recommended Amount of VeggiesHealthy Eating Could Delay Onset of Parkinson's DiseaseFried Food a Big Factor in Heart Disease, StrokeStrict Low-Carb Diets Could Push Type 2 Diabetes Into Remission, But Effect FadesClimate Change Is Spurring Malnutrition in Kids WorldwidePlant-Based Diet Brings Better 'Microbiome,' Healthier LifeAHA News: Trendy Microgreens Offer Flavor You Can Grow at HomeMediterranean Diet Could Help Stop Prostate Cancer's SpreadWhen Soda Tax Repealed, Soda Sales Rebound: StudyCan 2 Nutrients Lower Your Risk for Parkinson's?AHA News: Ring In the New Year With a 'Mocktail'New Dietary Guidelines for Americans Ignore Recommendations on Sugar, AlcoholWhich Seafood Has the Highest Amount of Microplastics?Could Going Vegetarian Lower Kids' Asthma Risk?1 in 7 Studies in Nutrition Journals Have Food Industry TiesAHA News: Teatime Can Be Good for Your HealthSugary Drinks' Effect on Hormones Could Spur Weight Gain: StudySocial Media Messages Can Lower People's Meat IntakeAHA News: The Best Foods for Brain HealthGet Rid of Red Meat to Help Your Heart: StudyMetabolites From Food Could Affect Your Stroke RiskAHA News: Eating Foods That Promote Inflammation May Worsen Heart FailureCocoa Might Give Your Brain a Boost: StudyAHA News: Teens' Ultra-Processed Diet Puts Their Hearts at RiskMediterranean Diet Cuts Women's Odds for DiabetesJunk Food, Booze Often Star in America's Hit MoviesVegan Diets Tied to Higher Bone Fracture RiskAHA News: Tackling Turkey Day: Strategies for a Healthy FeastAHA News: Inconsistent Mealtimes Linked to Heart RisksHot Discovery: Chili Peppers Might Extend Your LifeAHA News: Is Honey Healthy? How to Make Sure You Don't Get StungNearly 1 in 5 Americans Follows 'Special' DietTips for a Healthier Holiday SeasonDiet Drinks Don't Do Your Heart Any FavorsAHA News: Persimmons Pack Plenty of Nutritional PunchRestricting Promotions of Sweet Foods Cuts Sugar, Not Profits: StudyWhat Foods, Medicines Can Lower Your Colon Cancer Risk?Americans Are Cutting Back on Sugary Drinks
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development

Which Seafood Has the Highest Amount of Microplastics?

HealthDay News
by Cara Murez
Updated: Dec 28th 2020

new article illustration

MONDAY, Dec. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Those mussels, oysters and scallops on your plate may come with a secret ingredient: microplastics.

Researchers at Hull York Medical School and the University of Hull in the United Kingdom reviewed more than 50 studies (from 2014 to 2020) to investigate the levels of microplastic contamination globally in fish and shellfish.

The investigators found that mollusks (such as clams, mussels, oysters and scallops) had the highest levels. Mollusks collected off the coasts of Asia were the most heavily contaminated with microplastics. The researchers suggested that these areas are more heavily polluted by plastic.

Scientists are still trying to understand the health implications for humans consuming fish and shellfish contaminated with these tiny particles of waste plastic, according to the report.

"No one yet fully understands the full impact of microplastics on the human body, but early evidence from other studies suggest they do cause harm," said study author Evangelos Danopoulos. He's a postgraduate student at Hull York Medical School.

"A critical step in understanding the full impact on human consumption is in first fully establishing what levels of microplastics humans are ingesting," Danopoulos said in a University of York news release. "We can start to do this by looking at how much seafood and fish is eaten, and measuring the amount of [microplastics] in these creatures."

The research showed that microplastic content was 0 to 10.5 microplastics per gram in mollusks, 0.1 to 8.6 microplastics per gram in crustaceans and 0 to 2.9 microplastics per gram in fish.

The largest consumers of mollusks are China, Australia, Canada, Japan and the United States, followed by Europe and the United Kingdom, the study authors noted.

Plastic waste that ends up in oceans, lakes and rivers can potentially end up inside shellfish, fish and marine mammals. Plastic waste generated worldwide is expected to triple to 155 to 265 million metric tons per year by 2060.

The researchers said more data is needed from different parts of the world to understand how the issue varies between different oceans, seas and waterways. They said there is a need to standardize methods of measuring microplastic contamination so it can be more easily compared.

The report was published online Dec. 23 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

More information

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association has information on ocean pollution.

SOURCE: University of York, news release, Dec. 23, 2020