24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Sleep Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
How to Sleep Better During the PandemicAHA News: Exercise May Reduce Sleep Apnea and Improve Brain HealthSleep Apnea Patients Struggle as Common CPAP Machine Is RecalledRecall of Philips Breathing Machines Affects Millions of Americans'Date Rape' Drug Gets FDA Approval to Treat Rare Sleep DisorderSleep Apnea Doubles Odds for Sudden DeathAHA News: Severe Sleep Apnea Could Damage Key Blood VesselsWant to Avoid Sleep Apnea? Get Off the SofaSleepless Nights Can Quickly Mess Up Your EmotionsSleep Apnea in Childhood a Bad Sign for Teenage Heart HealthMore Than a Snore? Recognize the Signs of Sleep ApneaWhy Music at Bedtime Might Not Be a Great IdeaPoor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia RiskNew Links Between Poor Sleep, Diabetes and DeathAHA News: Kids With Sleep Apnea Into Teen Years Could Develop High Blood PressureSleep Apnea Raises Odds for Severe COVID-19Do Prescription Sleep Medicines Even Work?Sleep Disorders Cost U.S. Health Care System Nearly $95 Billion Per YearLullaby Effect: Music Can Speed Your Way to Sleep, Study Finds'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your HealthSleepwalking Tied to Higher Odds for Parkinson's in MenSleep Issues Are Soaring in U.S. Military: StudyGrumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep ScheduleCPAP Mask for Sleep Apnea May Boost Daytime Activity LevelsFDA Approves 'Tongue Strengthening' Device for Certain Sleep Apnea PatientsAHA News: Sleep Disorders Plague Stroke Survivors – and Put Them at RiskHow to Sleep Better in 2021Once Begun, Insomnia Is Tough to Shake: StudyDoes Taking Screens Away Help Sleep-Deprived Teens?Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 5-9, 2010
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders

Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

HealthDay News
by Cara Murez
Updated: Feb 23rd 2021

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A steady sleep routine may do more than keep you well-rested: New research suggests that the more swings in your slumber schedule, the worse your mood and depression symptoms are likely to be.

Researchers from Michigan Medicine followed the sleep patterns of interns in their first year of residency after medical school. That irregular sleep schedule can increase a person's risk of depression as much as getting fewer overall hours of sleep or staying up late most nights, according to the study.

The scientists used fitness trackers to determine the sleep and activity of more than 2,100 early-career physicians. They gathered mood data by asking the interns to report their daily mood on a smartphone app and to take quarterly tests for signs of depression. The researchers tracked the information for an average of two weeks before the doctors' internships began and four months during their intern year.

Interns already had long, intense workdays and irregular schedules, which made them a group that could be readily studied. With an average age of 27 and having completed their medical degrees, they were not representative of the broader population.

"These devices, for the first time, allow us to record sleep over extensive time periods without effort on behalf of the user," said Dr. Cathy Goldstein, an associate professor of neurology and physician in the Sleep Disorders Center at Michigan Medicine.

Interns whose devices showed they had variable sleep schedules were more likely to score higher on standardized depression symptom questionnaires and to have lower daily mood ratings, as were those who regularly stayed up late or got the fewest hours of sleep, the study authors said in a Michigan Medicine news release.

The findings add to what's already known about the association between sleep, daily mood and long-term risk of depression, the researchers said.

Dr. Srijan Sen, who leads the larger Intern Health Study, said, "These findings highlight sleep consistency as an underappreciated factor to target in depression and wellness."

The Intern Health Study is funded by the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The latest findings were published online Feb. 18 in the journal npj Digital Medicine.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sleep and sleep disorders.

SOURCE: Michigan Medicine, news release, Feb. 18, 2021