24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Diabetes
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Psychiatric Disorders and Type 2 Diabetes Often Go TogetherLow-Dose Aspirin Won't Affect Dementia Risk in People With DiabetesPeople With Diabetes Less Likely to Spot Dangerous A-Fib: StudyHave Diabetes? Here's How to Save Your SightMore Fast-Food Outlets, More Diabetes in Your NeighborhoodStatins: Good for the Heart, Maybe Not So Good for DiabetesMedtronic Expands Recall Of Thousands of Insulin PumpsScientists Untangle Why Diabetes Might Raise Alzheimer's RiskWhat Blood Sugar Levels Best Protect Against Heart Trouble in Those With Diabetes?Osteoporosis Drug May Keep Type 2 Diabetes at BayIs Insulin Resistance a Recipe for Depression?Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in KidsBlack Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in LifeAHA News: How a Simple Tape Measure May Help Predict Diabetes in Black AdultsExpert Panel Lowers Routine Screening Age for Diabetes to 35Dangerous Diabetes Tied to Pregnancy Is on the RiseDiabetes in Pregnancy Tied to Eye Issues in KidsDiabetes-Linked Amputations: Your Race, State MattersDiet Key to Better Health in People With DiabetesWhen Deductibles Rise, More Diabetes Patients Skip Their MedsType 2 Diabetes in Teens Can Bring Dangerous Complications in 20sFDA OKs Automatic Use of a Cheaper GenericĀ  InsulinAHA News: Diabetes and Dementia Risk: Another Good Reason to Keep Blood Sugar in CheckAmericans With Diabetes Were Hit Hard by COVID PandemicAHA News: The Challenge of Diabetes in the Black Community Needs Comprehensive SolutionsWhich Blood Sugar Meds Work Best Against Type 2 Diabetes?Walmart to Offer Low-Priced InsulinPoorly Managed Diabetes Raises Odds for More Severe COVIDWeekly Injected Drug Could Boost Outcomes for Patients With Type 2 DiabetesLockdown Weight Gain May Have Caused Surge in New Diabetes Cases in KidsAmerica Is Losing the War Against DiabetesA Fruitful Approach to Preventing DiabetesIn People With Type 1 Diabetes, Poor Blood Sugar Control Could Raise Dementia RiskBlood Sugar Tests Using Sweat, Not Blood? They Could Be on the WayWhen Diabetes Strikes in Pregnancy, Do Women Eat Healthier?Being a 'Night Owl' Raises Odds for Diabetes If You're Obese'Prediabetes' Raises Odds for Heart Attack, StrokeDementia Risk Rises as Years Lived With Type 2 Diabetes IncreasesCOVID-19 and Advanced Diabetes Can Be a Deadly Mix: StudyPandemic May Be Upping Cases of Severe Complication in Kids With DiabetesDiabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers HopeCan a Drug Help Prevent Diabetic Vision Loss?Diabetes Is Deadlier for Black Americans: StudyLockdowns Gave Boost to Type 1 Diabetes Control in KidsComing Soon: Once-a-Week Insulin Injections?Common Type 2 Diabetes Meds Won't Raise Breast Cancer Risk: StudySome Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Face High Risk of Severe COVID-19Breakfast Timing Could Affect Your Odds for DiabetesBegin Routine Diabetes Screening at 35 for Overweight, Obese Americans: Task ForceCould a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?
Links
Related Topics

Medical Disorders

Women With Type 1 Diabetes May Have Fewer Childbearing Years: Study

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 4th 2021

new article illustration

THURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes may have a shorter length of time to conceive and bear children compared to those without the disease, new research suggests.

The hormone insulin plays an important part in regulating female reproductive function, and people with type 1 diabetes don't make enough insulin on their own. But little was known about how type 1 diabetes affects the start of menopause, when a woman's ability to bear children ends.

To find out, researchers looked at nearly 300 women and compared women with type 1 diabetes to those without diabetes.

The findings showed that compared to women without diabetes, those with type 1 start menstruating later and enter menopause earlier. The researchers said this is because insulin deficiency and high blood sugar levels disrupt normal function of their reproductive system.

The study authors noted that these findings only apply to women who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before they started having periods, a milestone known as menarche.

Menopause is associated with a number of changes in metabolism and physical function, and early natural menopause is linked to increased risk of heart disease and death. As such, there is a need to identify factors that may help predict when a woman will enter menopause, the researchers noted.

In addition, more research is needed to identify modifiable factors that contribute to early menopause in women with diabetes in order to improve their reproductive health, according to study author Yan Yi, of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues.

The findings were published online March 1 in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

"This study found that women with the onset of type 1 diabetes before menarche were at increased risk for a shorter reproductive lifespan. Thus, these women are not only at risk for premature ovarian aging because of early-onset type 1 diabetes, they are also at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and early mortality because of early natural menopause," said Dr. Stephanie Faubion, NAMS medical director.

"Understanding these risks and targeting appropriate risk-reducing strategies are key to optimizing the health and quality of life of these women," she added in a society news release.

More information

The U.S. Office on Women's Health has more about menopause.

SOURCE: North American Menopause Society, news release, March 3, 2021