24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Dementia Cases Will Nearly Triple Worldwide by 2050: StudyFDA Panel Advisor Who Panned New Alzheimer's Drug Speaks Out'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer'sCleaning Up the Air Could Help Prevent Alzheimer'sLong-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than ThoughtDrug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked PsychosisAHA News: Diabetes and Dementia Risk: Another Good Reason to Keep Blood Sugar in Check1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: StudyTwo Major Health Systems Won't Administer Controversial New Alzheimer's DrugMost Marriages Survive a Spouse's Brain InjuryMedicare Mulls Coverage for Controversial Alzheimer's DrugFDA Head Asks for Investigation Into Alzheimer's Drug ApprovalNew Prescribing Instructions Tighten Use of Controversial Alzheimer's DrugMissing Teeth, Higher Odds for Dementia?AHA News: Smoking Harms the Brain, Raises Dementia Risk – But Not If You QuitHealthy Living Can Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sKeeping Same Nurse for All Home Health Care May Be Crucial for Dementia PatientsMost Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: StudyLilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's DrugCould a Type of Statin Raise Dementia Risks?Good News, Bad News From Alzheimer's Vaccine TrialPoor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia RiskFDA Approves Alzheimer's Drug Despite Expert Panel's ObjectionsFDA Defends Approval of Controversial Alzheimer's DrugPeople of Color Have Twice the Risk of Dying After Brain Injury, Study FindsIn People With Type 1 Diabetes, Poor Blood Sugar Control Could Raise Dementia RiskThere's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's ResearchHealthy Living Helps Prevent Dementia, Even If It Runs in the FamilyAHA News: Is It Normal Aging or Early Signs of Dementia?Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia RiskDementia Risk Rises as Years Lived With Type 2 Diabetes IncreasesHead Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar WaysBrain Injuries Raise Long-Term Risk of StrokeResearch Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer'sAssisted Living Centers Can Do More for Dementia Patients, Experts SayDiminished Hearing, Vision Together Could Be Risk Factor for Dementia6 Steps to Reduce Caregiver StressLoneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer'sDrug Used in Cancer Patients Might Help Treat Alzheimer's'Non-Drug' Approaches Can Fight Depression in People With DementiaSuicide Attempts Spike Soon After Dementia DiagnosisCould a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?AHA News: Dementia May Be a Risk Factor for Infection But Not Death From COVID-19Your Eyes May Signal Your Risk for Stroke, DementiaEven 1 Concussion May Raise Your Odds for Dementia LaterAlzheimer's Patients Are Being Given Too Many MedsMany Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia StrikesAlzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different Ways
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

6 Steps to Reduce Caregiver Stress


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 4th 2021

new article illustration

SUNDAY, April 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease can be mentally and physically exhausting, so you should take steps to manage and reduce stress, according to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

"Finding ways to manage and reduce stress is of paramount importance for every Alzheimer's caregiver. Untreated stress can lead to physical, mental and emotional caregiver burnout," Jennifer Reeder, director of educational and social services, said in a foundation news release.

The foundation offers the following six tips to help caregivers enhance their stress-coping skills:

Be adaptable and positive. Your attitude influences stress levels for both you and your loved one. Being able to "go with the flow" will help both of you stay relaxed. If you get aggravated or agitated, odds are that your loved one will, too. Try to adjust to situations in constructive ways.

Deal with what you can control. Remember that some things are out of your control, such as the coronavirus pandemic. What you can control is how you respond and react to these outside factors.

Set realistic goals and take it slow. Everything can't be resolved immediately and it doesn't need to be, so don't have unrealistic expectations. Set priorities and practical goals, do your best to achieve them, and take things one day at a time.

Take care of your health. Too little rest, poor diet and lack of exercise can worsen stress and cause other health problems. Try to get enough sleep, eat right, drink plenty of water and be active. You can't provide good care if you don't look after yourself.

Clear your mind. Exercise, yoga, meditation, listening to music and deep breathing can help relax your mind and reduce stress. Identify what works for you and do it on a regular basis.

Share your feelings. Talking with family members, trusted friends or a professional can also help relieve stress.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about Alzheimer's caregiving.

SOURCE: Alzheimer's Foundation of America, news release, March 30, 2021