24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Sleep Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
How to Sleep Better During the PandemicAHA News: Exercise May Reduce Sleep Apnea and Improve Brain HealthSleep Apnea Patients Struggle as Common CPAP Machine Is RecalledRecall of Philips Breathing Machines Affects Millions of Americans'Date Rape' Drug Gets FDA Approval to Treat Rare Sleep DisorderSleep Apnea Doubles Odds for Sudden DeathAHA News: Severe Sleep Apnea Could Damage Key Blood VesselsWant to Avoid Sleep Apnea? Get Off the SofaSleepless Nights Can Quickly Mess Up Your EmotionsSleep Apnea in Childhood a Bad Sign for Teenage Heart HealthMore Than a Snore? Recognize the Signs of Sleep ApneaWhy Music at Bedtime Might Not Be a Great IdeaPoor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia RiskNew Links Between Poor Sleep, Diabetes and DeathAHA News: Kids With Sleep Apnea Into Teen Years Could Develop High Blood PressureSleep Apnea Raises Odds for Severe COVID-19Do Prescription Sleep Medicines Even Work?Sleep Disorders Cost U.S. Health Care System Nearly $95 Billion Per YearLullaby Effect: Music Can Speed Your Way to Sleep, Study Finds'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your HealthSleepwalking Tied to Higher Odds for Parkinson's in MenSleep Issues Are Soaring in U.S. Military: StudyGrumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep ScheduleCPAP Mask for Sleep Apnea May Boost Daytime Activity LevelsFDA Approves 'Tongue Strengthening' Device for Certain Sleep Apnea PatientsAHA News: Sleep Disorders Plague Stroke Survivors – and Put Them at RiskHow to Sleep Better in 2021Once Begun, Insomnia Is Tough to Shake: StudyDoes Taking Screens Away Help Sleep-Deprived Teens?Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 5-9, 2010
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders

Want to Avoid Sleep Apnea? Get Off the Sofa

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: Jul 22nd 2021

new article illustration

THURSDAY, July 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Here's yet another reason to limit screen time and get moving: Boosting your activity levels could reduce your risk of sleep apnea, according to a new study.

Compared to the most active people in the study, those who spent more than four hours a day sitting watching TV had a 78% higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and those with sedentary jobs had a 49% higher risk.

And that added risk was not due to their weight.

"We saw a clear relationship between levels of physical activity, sedentary behavior and OSA risk. People who followed the current World Health Organization physical activity guidelines of getting at least 150 minutes of moderate activity per week, and who spent less than four hours per day sitting watching TV, had substantially lower OSA risk," said study leader Tianyi Huang, an assistant professor and associate epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, in Boston.

People with this disorder stop and start breathing many times during sleep. Common symptoms include snoring, disrupted sleep and excessive tiredness. Poorly managed sleep apnea can increase the risk of high blood pressure, stroke, heart attack, irregular heartbeat and type 2 diabetes.

After accounting for risk factors such as obesity, age, smoking and drinking, the researchers found that people whose activity levels were equivalent to three hours of running a week had a 54% lower risk of sleep apnea than those whose activity levels were equivalent to two hours a week of walking at an average pace.

The study included more than 138,000 U.S. women and men without a diagnosis of sleep apnea. They were followed for 10 to 18 years. Over that time, more than 8,700 were diagnosed with the condition.

So are desk jockeys doomed? Not necessarily.

The researchers said folks with sedentary jobs could lower their risk by getting more exercise in their leisure time. Also, those who can't do much physical activity due to physical limitations could lower their risk of sleep apnea by standing or doing other gentle activities more often.

The study was published July 20 in the European Respiratory Journal.

"Importantly, we saw that any additional increase in physical activity, and/or a reduction in sedentary hours, could have benefits that reduce the risk of developing OSA," Huang explained in a journal news release.

The difference in risk between sedentary work and time spent sitting watching TV could be explained by other behaviors related to those activities, the researchers suggested.

"For example, snacking and drinking sugary drinks is more likely to go along with watching TV compared with being sedentary at work or elsewhere, such as sitting during traveling. This could lead to additional weight gain, which we know to be a risk factor for OSA," Huang noted.

It's estimated that 1 billion adults worldwide, aged 30 to 69, have mild to severe sleep apnea.

Anita Simonds, president of the European Respiratory Society, was not involved with the study but commented on the report. She said, "It is encouraging that even a small increase in physical activity or reduction in sedentary hours could reap potential benefits. It is therefore an important message to get across to our patients and their families in primary care and respiratory clinics."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on sleep apnea.

SOURCE: European Respiratory Journal, news release, July 20, 2021