24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Financial Issues
Resources
Basic Information
CalculatorsMoney in Life ContextMoney ManagementManaging DebtInsurance & Financial Risk ManagementHousingAutomobilesInvestmentsRetirementEstate PlanningTaxesLatest News
Many Cancer Patients Face Mounting Bills Despite Having InsuranceMonths After New Rule, More Than Half of U.S. Hospitals Still Don't Disclose Prices OnlineBiden Pledges to Lower Prescription Drug Prices for AmericansAlmost 13 Million Americans Per Year Skip Meds Due to CostWorkers' Share of Annual Premium for Employer Health Plans Nears $6,000Financial Stress Burdens More Than Half of New U.S. Moms: StudyCancer Costs U.S. Patients $21 Billion a YearOut-of-Pocket Medical Bills for COVID-19 May Average $3,800 in 2021: Study18 Million Americans Can't Pay for Needed MedsParents of Hospitalized Kids Need More Info on Costs: StudyHealth Savings Accounts Used Least by People Who Need Them Most: PollAverage COVID Hospitalization Is 150 Times More Expensive Than VaccinationAmericans' COVID Medical Bills Are Set to RiseLong COVID, Big Bills: Grim Legacy of Even Short Hospital StaysHow Did New 'Surprise Medical Bill' Laws Affect Your State?Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical DebtWealth & Health: How Big Financial Changes Affect Your Heart$10,000: What New Parents Might Pay for Childbirth, Even With InsuranceWhy a COVID Diagnosis Could Cost You Way More Money in 2021Average COVID Hospital Bill for U.S. Seniors Nearly $22,000Out-of-Pocket Costs Delay Cancer Follow-Up Care, Even for the InsuredFor the Poor, Even a Small Medical Bill Can Trigger Coverage LossJob Losses Hit Americans Hard in Pandemic, Report ConfirmsMedical Bill Worries Tied to Worse Outcomes for Cancer Patients: StudyOpioid Use (and Overuse) for Knee Arthritis Takes Big Financial TollBig Paychecks Pay Off in Self-Confidence, Study FindsPandemic Unemployment Benefits Helped Keep Millions of Americans From Going Hungry
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Americans' COVID Medical Bills Are Set to Rise

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 3rd 2021

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Sept. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 care is likely to get more expensive for Americans with the expiration of insurers' temporary waivers on costs associated with treating the illness.

Earlier in the pandemic, patients didn't have their normal co-payments or deductibles for emergency room visits or hospital stays for COVID-19, and most tests were also free, The New York Times reported.

As the pandemic continues to rage nationwide, federal law still requires that insurers cover testing at no cost to patients when they have a medical reason for seeking care, such as exposure to the disease or a display of symptoms.

However, more of the tests now being sought by Americans are for monitoring and don't qualify as a medical reason, the Times reported.

For example, the federal rules for free coronavirus tests have exemptions for routine workplace and school testing.

Some patients have already received bills as high as $200 for routine screenings, according to patient documents submitted to a Times project tracking the costs of COVID-19 testing and treatment.

However, "insurers are confronting the question about whether the costs of COVID treatment should fall on everyone, or just the individuals who have chosen not to get a vaccine," Cynthia Cox, a vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation who has researched how insurers are covering COVID-19 treatment, told the Times.

Some of the highest bills are likely to be faced by COVID patients who require extensive hospital care, and most of those patients are now unvaccinated. A recent Kaiser Family Foundation study found that 72% of large health plans are no longer making COVID-19 treatment free for patients.

Unvaccinated people could also face other increased costs. Delta Air Lines and some other businesses plan to charge unvaccinated workers higher rates for insurance, pointing to high hospitalization costs for COVID-19, the Times reported.

Research shows that the average COVID-19 hospitalization costs about $40,000, while a longer stay that includes time in the intensive care unit or air ambulance transfer can cost many times more.

More information

Visit the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration for more on COVID treatment and testing relief costs.


SOURCE: The New York Times