24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Long-Haul COVID in Kids Typically Ends Within 3 Months: StudyPfizer, Moderna Vaccines Still Offer Good Protection Against Severe COVID: StudyTrial Into Antioxidant for Parkinson's Disease Yields Disappointing ResultsIs Flu Ready for a Comeback? Get Your ShotCommon Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for DementiaDrug Might Stop Heart Trouble Linked to Sickle Cell AnemiaChild Obesity Rose Sharply During PandemicFDA Advisory Panel to Meet on COVID Booster ShotsStatin Cholesterol Drugs May Help Fight Ulcerative ColitisAHA News: Physical Activity Is Helpful After a Stroke, But How Much Is Healthy?Special 'Strategies' Can Help People With Parkinson's Walk, But Many Patients UnawareEven When Undergoing Treatment, People With MS Gain From COVID VaccinesNIH Spending Nearly $470 Million on Long-Haul COVID StudyHospitalizing the Unvaccinated Has Cost U.S. Nearly $6 BillionIn 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDCPet Store Puppies Passing Drug-Resistant Bacteria to PeopleIs a Combo COVID/Flu Shot on the Way?1 in 500 Americans Has Died From COVID-19Having Even a Cousin or Grandparent With Colon Cancer Raises Your Risk: StudyBlood Cancer Patients Could Benefit From COVID Booster Shot: StudyWHO Says Africa Will Get 30% of COVID Vaccines It Needs by FebruaryCOVID Vaccines for Kids Under 12 Could Come This Fall: FauciEbola Vaccine Effective in African Clinical TrialBritain OK's COVID Vaccine for Kids 12 and Older; Hopes to Avoid LockdownsIsraeli Data on COVID Boosters to Be Published This Week in Major JournalData Doesn't Support Need for COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters: ExpertsCOVAX Cuts Global COVID Vaccine Supply Estimates By a QuarterMonth-Long Recovery From Concussion Is Normal: StudyDeath From COVID 11 Times More Likely If You're Unvaccinated: StudyL.A. Is First Major School District to Mandate Vaccines for Students 12 and UpNew Tally Adds Extra 16,000 U.S. Nursing Home Residents Lost to COVIDBlack Americans, Mexican Americans Develop Diabetes Earlier in LifeAverage COVID Hospitalization Is 150 Times More Expensive Than VaccinationGetting Your First COVID Shot Can Boost Mental Health: StudyVaccinated Have 1 in 13,000 Chance of Breakthrough Case Needing HospitalizationBiden Issues Tough New Vaccine Mandates Affecting Millions of U.S. WorkersTime Is Brain: Mobile Stroke Units Reduce Disability, Study FindsWildfires Cause More Than 33,000 Deaths Globally Each YearIs Your Workplace an Asthma Trigger?Biden to Strengthen Push for Vaccine Mandates in New COVID PlanAHA News: How a Simple Tape Measure May Help Predict Diabetes in Black AdultsEczema Can Take Toll on Child's Mental HealthNo Lasting Damage to Lungs After COVID in Young Patients: StudyAdults With Autism, Mental Illness May Be at Higher Risk for Severe COVIDIn Cancer Patients, COVID Vaccine Immunity at 6 Months Is Similar to General PopulationNew Insights Into Why Asthma Worsens at NightHere's How COVID-19 Can Affect Your MouthPet Dogs Can Alert Owners to Epileptic SeizuresU.S. COVID-19 Cases Now Top 40 MillionWhy Aren't COVID Vaccines Getting to People Globally?
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Diabetes

No Lasting Damage to Lungs After COVID in Young Patients: Study

HealthDay News
by Steven Reinberg
Updated: Sep 8th 2021

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Young people appear to have normal lung function after recovering from COVID-19, new studies find.

In one, Swedish researchers found that even asthma patients had no significant impairment in lung function.

In the other, German researchers found unimpaired lung function after kids and teens had a COVID-19 infection — unless their infection was severe.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has raised questions about if and how the lung is affected after clearance of the coronavirus infection, especially in young people from the general population with less severe disease. Until now, this has not been known," said Dr. Ida Mogensen, a post-doctoral fellow at the Karolinska Institute, who led the Swedish study.

Her team collected data on 661 young people. Of those, 27% had antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, indicating they had been infected. Lung function was measured in all participants.

"Our analysis showed similar lung function irrespective of COVID-19 history," Mogensen said. "When we included 123 participants with asthma in the analysis, the 24% who had had COVID-19 tended towards having a slightly lower lung function, but this was not statistically significant."

She called the results reassuring, but said researchers plan to expand the study.

"In particular, we want to look more closely at people with asthma as the group in this study was fairly small," she said. "We are also curious as to whether the length of time after the infection is important, as well as the severity of disease and symptoms."

The German study looked at the long-term effects of COVID-19 in 73 children and teens between August 2020 and March 2021.

"Although children and adolescents tend to suffer less severe symptoms from COVID-19 infection than adults, to date there is only preliminary evidence about long-term effects of COVID-19 on pulmonary function in children and adolescents," said study leader Dr. Anne Schlegtendal. She is a specialist in pediatric and adolescent medicine and pediatric pulmonology at University Children's Hospital, Ruhr-University-Bochum.

Schlegtendal said it's important to evaluate this in children since vaccines are predominately reserved right now for adults and high-risk groups.

For their study, her team did lung function tests between two weeks and six months after COVID-19 infection, and compared the results with those of 45 kids who had not been infected.

"We found no statistically significant differences in the frequency of abnormal lung function," Schlegtendal said in a news release from the European Respiratory Society. "They occurred in 16% of the COVID-19 group and 28% of the control group."

Further analysis found a reduction in the volume of air in the lungs that can be exhaled after a deep breath — known as forced vital capacity — in patients who had suffered severe infection, be it COVID-19 or something else, Schlegtendal said.

"These findings should offer some reassurance to children, adolescents and their families," she said. "Severity of infection proved to be the only predictor for mild lung function changes and this is independent of a COVID-19 infection."

Schlegtendal said the discrepancy between persistent breathing problems and normal lung function suggests there may be a different underlying cause, such as dysfunctional breathing, a problem that has also been identified in adults.

The findings were scheduled for presentation Tuesday at an online meeting of the European Respiratory Society. Findings presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more on COVID-19, head to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCE: European Respiratory Society, news release, Sept. 7, 2021