24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
AHA News: Statistics Report Offers Snapshot of the Nation's Brain Health – And a Guide to Protecting ItKeeping Weight Stable Could Help Save Your BrainMedicare Proposes to Only Cover Alzheimer's Drug Aduhelm for Use in Clinical TrialsAduhelm: Will Medicare Cover the Controversial Alzheimer's Drug?More U.S. Seniors, Especially Women, Are Retaining Healthy Brains: StudyMaker Cuts Price of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug in HalfCertain Meds Raise Odds for Delirium After SurgeryCould Viagra Help Prevent Alzheimer's?Clearing Out Clutter Might Not Help People With DementiaLifetime Spent With Epilepsy Ages the Brain, Study FindsHigh Heart Rate Linked to Dementia Risk'Mild Cognitive Impairment' in Older Age Often Disappears, Study FindsMore Years Playing Football, More Brain Lesions on MRI: StudyReminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early DementiaNeurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's DrugTrial Begins of Nasal Vaccine for Alzheimer's DiseaseAlzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social LifeMany People May Be Eating Their Way to DementiaCould Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?Purrfect Pal: Robotic Cats May Help People With DementiaRight Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer'sAHA News: Hearing Loss and the Link to DementiaDepression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk LaterScientists Untangle Why Diabetes Might Raise Alzheimer's RiskTracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI PatientsMIND Diet May Guard Against Alzheimer'sSigns of Early Alzheimer's May Be Spotted in Brain StemCould Cholesterol Help Drive Alzheimer's Disease?Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for DementiaMultigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia RiskMost Alzheimer's Patients Wouldn't Have Qualified for Controversial Drug's Trial: StudyCould Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?AHA News: What Are Researchers Doing to Stop Dementia?A Mentally Challenging Job Could Help Ward Off DementiaDirty Air, Higher Dementia Risk?An ALS Drug Shows Early Promise Against Alzheimer'sAHA News: Dementia Can Complicate Heart Recovery and TreatmentDeaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural AmericaCould COVID-19 Accelerate Alzheimer's Symptoms?Dementia Cases Will Nearly Triple Worldwide by 2050: StudyFDA Panel Advisor Who Panned New Alzheimer's Drug Speaks Out'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer'sCleaning Up the Air Could Help Prevent Alzheimer'sLong-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than ThoughtDrug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked PsychosisAHA News: Diabetes and Dementia Risk: Another Good Reason to Keep Blood Sugar in Check1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: StudyTwo Major Health Systems Won't Administer Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

Multigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia Risk

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Sep 14th 2021

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to be somehow linked to risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, a new multigenerational study has found.

Parents and grandparents of people with ADHD have a higher risk of Alzheimer's and dementia than people with no ADHD in their family, Swedish researchers said.

Specifically, parents of an ADHD child have a 34% higher risk of dementia and 55% higher risk of Alzheimer's, the results showed. Grandparents have about an 11% increased risk of either condition.

"ADHD is associated with dementia across generations," said lead researcher Le Zhang, a doctoral candidate with the Karolinska Institute's department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics, in Stockholm. "Our study calls attention to advancing the understanding of ADHD and cognitive decline in older age."

However, it's unclear what might tie the two conditions together, the researchers said.

The largest genetic studies on ADHD and dementia to date "have failed to detect any genetic variant in common," Zhang explained.

But she noted that "there have been studies suggesting that certain genes may be implicated in both ADHD and dementia."

Another possibility is that outside influences on health might increase the risk of both diseases within a family, such as financial distress, obesity or substance use, Zhang added.

For example, the researchers said that ADHD in children and adults has been associated with excess weight, and at the same time middle-aged obesity has been tied to increased risk of dementia later in life.

Heather Snyder, vice president of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer's Association, said, "This is an association study; it shows that two things are somehow connected. Because of how the study was conducted, it does not — and cannot — prove causation. But it is interesting all the same."

For the study, Zhang and her colleagues analyzed data on more than 2 million people born in Sweden between 1980 and 2001. About 3% were diagnosed with ADHD, which is characterized by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Using national registries, the research team linked the ADHD patients to more than 5 million biological relatives — parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. They then checked to see whether these relatives had developed dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

Parents did have a significant increased risk of dementia, but the researchers noted that the risk decreased with the distance of family relation. Grandparents had a lower risk than parents, and aunts and uncles even less.

And even though parents of ADHD kids had a significantly increased risk of dementia, their absolute risk of the degenerative brain condition remained low, the study authors said. Overall, fewer than 0.2% of the parents identified in the study actually wound up diagnosed with dementia.

"More research is needed to uncover specifically why and how these two diseases are related. That might eventually give us insight into how to manage risk or even improve treatment," Snyder said.

The new study was published online Sept. 9 in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about the genetics of Alzheimer's disease.

SOURCES: Le Zhang, doctoral candidate, department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Heather Snyder, PhD, vice president, medical and scientific relations, Alzheimer's Association; Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, Sept. 9, 2021, online