24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (877)SAFEGBC or (877)723-3422 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Issues

6502 Nursery Drive, Suite 100
Victoria, TX 77904
(361)575-0611
Fax: (361)578-5500
Regular Hours: M-Fri 8am - 5pm
Every 3rd Thurs of the Month - Extended Hours Until 7 pm

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Many Marijuana Vendors Aim Advertising at Kids: StudyHeart Function Rebounds for Kids With COVID-Linked MIS-CWhich Kids Are Most Vulnerable to Severe COVID-19?At-Home COVID Tests Accurate for Ki​ds: StudyCDC Study Shows Power of Flu Vaccine for KidsCOVID Hospitalizations Rising in Kids Too Young for VaccineNearly 600,000 U.S. Kids Had COVID Last WeekWhite House to Give Schools 10 Million Free COVID Tests Every MonthKids' Behavior Worsened With Remote Learning: StudyLater School Start Times Boost Parents' Health, TooUrban Air Pollution Drives Millions of Cases of Asthma in KidsCDC Backs Boosters for High-Risk Kids Aged 5-11, Shorter Time Between ShotsA Better Way to Correct Severe Scoliosis in Kids?Getting Your Child Their Vaccine?  Some Tips on Easing Needle FearsU.S. Hospitals Seeing Record Numbers of Young COVID PatientsSevere Illness in Children Brings Hardship for FamiliesReal-World Data Confirms Pfizer Vaccine Safe for Kids Ages 5-11Family Factors Affect Child's Odds for Cleft PalateAs Omicron Spreads, Child Hospitalizations Climb 30% in Past WeekNew Clues to Sudden Unexplained Deaths in Young KidsSevere Illness in a Child Takes Big Toll on Parents, Siblings: StudyProgram Aims to Get Lifesaving Drugs to Kids With Cancer in Poorer CountriesSchool COVID Outbreaks Drop When Adults Wear Masks, Study FindsMany Overweight Kids Already Have Hardened Arteries, DiabetesCDC Supports 'Test-to-Stay' Strategy for SchoolsJunk Food Ads Reaching Kids Through Livestream Gaming PlatformsWhat Does 'Long COVID' Look Like in Kids?New Drug a Good Treatment Option for Severe Asthma in KidsFebrile Seizures: How to Protect Your ChildNew Treatment Greatly Boosts Survival for Kids With a Rare, Aggressive CancerRisk of Vision Trouble Rises in Children With Type 2 DiabetesMore Time Outdoors May Lower Risk of MS in YouthNew Asthma Drug Helps Kids, But Price Tag Is HighUS Surgeon General Report Warns of Mental Health Crisis Hitting YouthAnother Benefit to Asthma Control for Kids: Less Bullying1 in 3 U.S. Children Lack Adequate Health InsuranceWhat's Behind Unexplained Epilepsy in Kids? A Gene Test May TellIs the Mumps Vaccine Becoming Less Effective?Autism Now Diagnosed in 1 in Every 44 Children, CDC SaysKids With Uncontrolled Asthma at Higher Odds for Severe COVID-19Nearly 7% of U.S. Kids Have Had a Head Injury or ConcussionAre Your Holiday Gifts on the 'Noisy Toy List'?Many Kids, Teens Think Girls Don't Care About Computer ScienceMost Parents Say Their Kids Aren't Thankful Enough: PollPandemic Curbed Kids' Efforts to Lose Excess WeightClimate Change May Not Increase Allergies in Kids With Asthma: StudyNearly 10% of Younger Kids Have Gotten First COVID Vaccine DoseAHA News: Family-Based Programs Targeting Childhood Obesity Can Be Good for Parents, TooCases of Children's Severe COVID-Linked Illness Were Worse in Second WaveFace Masks Don't Hide Emotions From Kids: Study
Questions and AnswersLinks
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Many Kids, Teens Think Girls Don't Care About Computer Science

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 29th 2021

new article illustration

MONDAY, Nov. 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half 51% believed girls are less interested than boys in computer science.

Moreover, 63% said girls are less interested in engineering, while only 14% said girls are more interested than boys in computer science, and only 9% said girls are more interested in engineering.

The researchers also conducted lab studies with a smaller number of children. They found that only 35% of girls chose a computer science activity when they were told boys were more interested in it than girls, but two-thirds of girls chose such an activity when told girls and boys were equally interested it.

The study was published recently in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"We discovered that labeling an activity in a stereotyped way influenced children's interest in it and their willingness to take it home the mere presence of the stereotype influenced kids in dramatic ways," said study co-author Andrew Meltzoff, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences at the University of Washington, in Seattle.

"This brought home to us the pernicious effect of stereotypes on children and teens," he added in a school news release.

Teachers and parents can make a difference by providing high-quality computer science and engineering activities early in elementary school and encouraging girls' participation, the study authors suggested.

According to lead author Allison Master, "Stereotypes that STEM [science, technology, engineering and math] is for boys begin in grade school, and by the time they reach high school, many girls have made their decision not to pursue degrees in computer science and engineering because they feel they don't belong." Master is an assistant professor of psychological, health and learning sciences at the University of Houston.

Computer science and engineering careers are lucrative, high status and influence many aspects of daily life. It's important that they be diversified, the researchers said.

More information

UNESCO has more on females and STEM.

SOURCE: University of Washington, news release, Nov. 22, 2021